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Look inside a giant supernova that seeded the universe

Astronomy News - 1 October 2014 - 5:30pm
Some of the very massive stars that populated the early universe exploded completely, sowing the seeds of future stars, solar systems and galaxies






Titan's swirling polar cloud is cold and toxic

Astronomy News - 1 October 2014 - 5:00pm
The international Cassini mission has revealed that a giant, toxic cloud is hovering over the south pole of Saturn's largest moon, Titan, after the atmosphere has cooled in a dramatic fashion.

NASA Mission Points to Origin of “Ocean of Storms” on Earth’s Moon

Astronomy News - 1 October 2014 - 4:00pm
Using data from NASA’s Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL), mission scientists have solved a lunar mystery almost as old as the moon itself.

Wild Ducks Take Flight in Open Cluster

Astronomy News - 1 October 2014 - 10:00am
The Wide Field Imager on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at ESO’s La Silla Observatory in Chile has taken this beautiful image, dappled with blue stars, of one of the most star-rich open clusters currently known — Messier 11, also known as NGC 6705 or the Wild Duck Cluster.

Astrophysics: Space ripples could pump up stars

Astronomy News - 1 October 2014 - 12:00am

Astrophysics: Space ripples could pump up stars

Nature 514, 7520 (2014). doi:10.1038/514009c

Gravitational waves could energize and brighten stars — possibly providing indirect evidence for the weak ripples in space time that are thought to be emitted by high-energy events such as exploding stars.Barry McKernan at the City University of New York and his colleagues calculated

Astronomy: The age of the quasars

Astronomy News - 1 October 2014 - 12:00am

Astronomy: The age of the quasars

Nature 514, 7520 (2014). doi:10.1038/514043a

Authors: Daniel Mortlock

An infrared census of accreting supermassive black holes across a wide range of cosmic times indicates that the canonical understanding of how these luminous objects form and evolve may need to be adjusted.

Earth gets a new companion for trip around sun

Astronomy News - 30 September 2014 - 5:30pm
Newly discovered asteroid 2014 OL339 is the latest member of the entourage of space rocks that temporarily join Earth in its orbit around the sun






Astronomy data bounty spurs debate over access

Astronomy News - 30 September 2014 - 12:00am

Astronomy data bounty spurs debate over access

Nature 514, 7520 (2014). http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/514018a

Author: Mark Zastrow

Small institutions fear exclusion from Large Synoptic Survey Telescope's benefits.

Four ways you can see the multiverse

Astronomy News - 25 September 2014 - 9:00pm
The multiverse, where every choice spawns many universes, sounds like a philosopher's fantasy, but these four experiments show it may be very real






Cosmic inflation is dead, long live cosmic inflation!

Astronomy News - 25 September 2014 - 4:41pm
The BICEP2 results hailed as demonstrating inflation in the early universe now seem to do the exact opposite, if they can be trusted at all






Life in the multiverse means endless possibilities

Astronomy News - 25 September 2014 - 7:00am
What if...? Whether or not we live in the best of all possible worlds, the multiverse can help us make the best decisions in this one






Water seen on Neptune-sized planet

Astronomy News - 24 September 2014 - 7:21pm
A cloud-free atmosphere reveals signs of water vapour on HAT-P-11b, the smallest planet beyond our Solar System ever to yield such an insight.

Multiverse me: Should I care about my other selves?

Astronomy News - 24 September 2014 - 7:00pm
Every decision you make may spawn parallel universes where people are suffering because of your choice. Welcome to the quantum moral maze (full text available to subscribers)






Hugh Everett: The man who gave us the multiverse

Astronomy News - 24 September 2014 - 5:00pm
The physicist developed the idea that we're living in a multiverse of countless universes, full of copies of each of us. His life was fascinating and tragic

NASA Telescopes Find Clear Skies and Water Vapor on Exo-Neptune

Astronomy News - 24 September 2014 - 5:00pm

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The weather forecast for a planet 120 light-years from Earth is clear skies and steamy water vapor. Finding clear skies on a gaseous world the size of Neptune is a good sign that even smaller, Earth-size planets might have similarly good visibility. This would allow earthbound astronomers to measure the underlying atmospheric composition of an exoplanet. Astronomers using the Hubble, Spitzer, and Kepler space telescopes were able to determine that the planet, cataloged HAT-P-11b, has water vapor in its atmosphere. The world is definitely steamy with temperatures over 1,000 degrees Fahrenheit. The planet is so hot because it orbits so close to its star, completing one orbit every five days.

Clear skies on exo-Neptune - Smallest exoplanet ever found to have water vapour [heic1420]

Astronomy News - 24 September 2014 - 5:00pm
Astronomers using data from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, the Spitzer Space Telescope, and the Kepler Space Telescope have discovered clear skies and steamy water vapour on a planet outside our Solar System. The planet, known as HAT-P-11b, is about the size of Neptune, making it the smallest exoplanet ever on which water vapour has been detected. The results will appear in the online version of the journal Nature on 24 September 2014.

Water found in atmosphere of exo-Neptune

Astronomy News - 24 September 2014 - 5:00pm
The smallest exoplanet yet to have its atmosphere probed is full of water and heavy elements, hinting it formed far from its star






Clear skies on exo-Neptune

Astronomy News - 24 September 2014 - 5:00pm

Astronomers have discovered clear skies and steamy water vapour on a gaseous planet outside our solar system. The planet, known as HAT-P-11b, is about the size of Neptune, making it the smallest-ever planet for which water vapour has been detected.

Using data from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, the Spitzer Space Telescope, and the Kepler Space Telescope, an international team including astronomers from the University of Cambridge found that HAT-P-11b is blanketed in water vapour, hydrogen gas, and other yet-to-be-identified molecules. The results are published today (24 September) in the online version of the journal Nature.

“This discovery is milepost on the road to eventually searching for molecules in the atmospheres of smaller, rocky planets more like Earth,” said John Grunsfeld, assistant administrator of NASA’s Science Mission Directorate. “Such achievements are only possible when we combine the capabilities of these unique and powerful observatories.”

Clouds in the atmospheres of planets can block the view to underlying molecules that reveal information about the planets’ compositions and histories. Finding clear skies on a Neptune-size planet is a good sign that smaller planets might have similarly good visibility.

“When astronomers go observing at night with telescopes, they say ‘clear skies’ to mean good luck,” said Jonathan Fraine of the University of Maryland, the study’s lead author. “In this case, we found clear skies on a distant planet. That's lucky for us because it means clouds didn't block our view of water molecules.”

HAT-P-11b is a so-called exo-Neptune — a Neptune-sized planet that orbits another star. It is located 120 light-years away in the constellation of Cygnus (The Swan). Unlike Neptune, this planet orbits closer to its star, making one lap roughly every five days. It is a warm world thought to have a rocky core, a mantle of fluid and ice, and a thick gaseous atmosphere. Not much else was known about the composition of the planet, or other exo-Neptunes like it, until now.

Part of the challenge in analysing the atmospheres of planets like this is their size. Larger Jupiter-like planets are easier to observe and researchers have already been able to detect water vapour in the atmospheres of some of these giant planets. Smaller planets are more difficult to probe — and all the smaller ones observed to date have appeared to be cloudy.

The team used Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3 and a technique called transmission spectroscopy, in which a planet is observed as it crosses in front of its parent star. Starlight filters through the rim of the planet’s atmosphere and into a telescope. If molecules like water vapour are present, they absorb some of the starlight, leaving distinct signatures in the light that reaches our telescopes.

“We set out to look at the atmosphere of HAT-P-11b without knowing if its weather would be cloudy or not,” said Dr Nikku Madhusudhan, from Cambridge’s Institute of Astronomy, who was part of the study team. “By using transmission spectroscopy, we could use Hubble to detect water vapour in the planet. This told us that the planet didn’t have thick clouds blocking the view and is a very hopeful sign that we can find and analyse more cloudless, smaller, planets in the future. It is ground-breaking!”

Before the team could celebrate they had to be sure that the water vapour was from the planet and not from cool starspots — “freckles” on the face of stars — on the parent star. Luckily, Kepler had been observing the patch of sky in which HAT-P-11b happens to lie for years. Those visible-light data were combined with targeted infrared Spitzer observations. By comparing the datasets the astronomers could confirm that the starspots were too hot to contain any water vapour, and so it must belong to the planet.

The results from all three telescopes demonstrate that HAT-P-11b is blanketed in water vapour, hydrogen gas, and other yet-to-be-identified molecules. So in fact it is not only the smallest planet to have water vapour found in its atmosphere but is also the smallest planet for which molecules of any kind have been directly detected using spectroscopy. Theorists will be drawing up new models to explain the planet’s makeup and origins.

Although HAT-P-11b is dubbed as an exo-Neptune it is actually quite unlike any planet in our Solar System. It is thought that exo-Neptunes may have diverse compositions that reflect their formation histories. New findings such as this can help astronomers to piece together a theory for the origin of these distant worlds.

“We are working our way down the line, from hot Jupiters to exo-Neptunes,” said Drake Deming, a co-author of the study also from University of Maryland. “We want to expand our knowledge to a diverse range of exoplanets.”

The astronomers plan to examine more exo-Neptunes in the future, and hope to apply the same method to smaller super-Earths — massive, rocky cousins to our home world with up to ten times the mass of Earth. Our solar system does not contain a super-Earth, but NASA’s Kepler mission is finding them around other stars in droves, and the NASA/ESA James Webb Space Telescope, scheduled to launch in 2018, will search super-Earths for signs of water vapour and other molecules. However, finding signs of oceans and potentially habitable worlds is likely a way off.

This work is important for future studies of super-Earths and even smaller planets. It could allow astronomers to pick out in advance the planets with atmospheres clear enough for molecules to be detected. Once again, astronomers will be crossing their fingers for clear skies.

Smallest exoplanet ever found to have water vapour

This is a very hopeful sign that we can find and analyse more cloudless, smaller, planets in the futureNikku MadhusudhanNASA/JPL-CaltechIllustration of the view from HAT-P-11b

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NASA Telescopes Find Clear Skies and Water Vapor on Exoplanet

Astronomy News - 24 September 2014 - 4:00pm
Astronomers using data from three of NASA's space telescopes -- Hubble, Spitzer and Kepler -- have discovered clear skies and steamy water vapor on a gaseous planet outside our solar system. The planet is about the size of Neptune, making it the smallest planet from which molecules of any kind have been detected.

Water vapour absorption in the clear atmosphere of a Neptune-sized exoplanet

Astronomy News - 24 September 2014 - 12:00am

Water vapour absorption in the clear atmosphere of a Neptune-sized exoplanet

Nature 513, 7519 (2014). doi:10.1038/nature13785

Authors: Jonathan Fraine, Drake Deming, Bjorn Benneke, Heather Knutson, Andrés Jordán, Néstor Espinoza, Nikku Madhusudhan, Ashlee Wilkins & Kamen Todorov

Transmission spectroscopy has so far detected atomic and molecular absorption in Jupiter-sized exoplanets, but intense efforts to measure molecular absorption in the atmospheres of smaller (Neptune-sized) planets during transits have revealed only featureless spectra. From this it was concluded that the majority of small, warm planets evolve to sustain atmospheres with high mean molecular weights (little hydrogen), opaque clouds or scattering hazes, reducing our ability to observe the composition of these atmospheres. Here we report observations of the transmission spectrum of the exoplanet HAT-P-11b (which has a radius about four times that of Earth) from the optical wavelength range to the infrared. We detected water vapour absorption at a wavelength of 1.4 micrometres. The amplitude of the water absorption (approximately 250 parts per million) indicates that the planetary atmosphere is predominantly clear down to an altitude corresponding to about 1 millibar, and sufficiently rich in hydrogen to have a large scale height (over which the atmospheric pressure varies by a factor of e). The spectrum is indicative of a planetary atmosphere in which the abundance of heavy elements is no greater than about 700 times the solar value. This is in good agreement with the core-accretion theory of planet formation, in which a gas giant planet acquires its atmosphere by accreting hydrogen-rich gas directly from the protoplanetary nebula onto a large rocky or icy core.