Institute of Astronomy

Astronomy News

Metal asteroid and Trojans selected for next NASA missions

5 January 2017 - 9:20am

The US space agency will send probes to metallic asteroid Psyche and the mysterious Trojans that flank Jupiter in the 2020s

NASA Selects Two Missions to Explore the Early Solar System

5 January 2017 - 9:19am
NASA has selected two missions that have the potential to open new windows on one of the earliest eras in the history of our solar system – a time less than 10 million years after the birth of our sun. The missions, known as Lucy and Psyche, were chosen from five finalists and will proceed to mission formulation.

Hidden Secrets of Orion’s Clouds

5 January 2017 - 9:18am
This spectacular new image is one of the largest near-infrared high-resolution mosaics of the Orion A molecular cloud, the nearest known massive star factory, lying about 1350 light-years from Earth. It was taken using the VISTA infrared survey telescope at ESO’s Paranal Observatory in northern Chile and reveals many young stars and other objects normally buried deep inside the dusty clouds.

Mystery cosmic radio bursts pinpointed

5 January 2017 - 9:17am

Astronomers have pinpointed the source of mysterious radio bursts from space.

NASA Selects Mission to Study Black Holes, Cosmic X-ray Mysteries

4 January 2017 - 9:11am
Portal origin URL: NASA Selects Mission to Study Black Holes, Cosmic X-ray Mysteries Portal origin nid: 395700Published: Tuesday, January 3, 2017 - 16:54Featured (stick to top of list): noPortal text teaser: NASA has selected a science mission that will allow astronomers to explore, for the first time, the hidden details of some of the most extreme and exotic astronomical objects, such as stellar and supermassive black holes, neutron stars and pulsars. Objects such as black holes can heat surrounding gases to more than a million degrees. The high-energy X-ray radiation from this gas can be polarized – vibrating in a particular direction. The Imaging X-ray Polarimetry Explorer (IXPE) mission will fly three space telescopes with cameras capable of measuring the polarization of these cosmic X-rays, allowing scientists to answer fundamental questions about these turbulent and extreme environments where gravitational, electric and magnetic fields are at their limits.  “We cannot directly image what’s going on near objects like black holes and neutron stars, but studying the polarization of X-rays emitted from their surrounding environments reveals the physics of these enigmatic objects,” said Paul Hertz, astrophysics division director for the Science Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters in Washington. “NASA has a great history of launching observatories in the Astrophysics Explorers Program with new and unique observational capabilities. IXPE will open a new window on the universe for astronomers to peer through. Today, we can only guess what we will find.” NASA's Astrophysics Explorers Program requested proposals for new missions in September 2014. Fourteen proposals were submitted, and three mission concepts were selected for additional review by a panel of agency and external scientists. NASA determined the IXPE proposal provided the best science potential and most feasible development plan. The mission, slated for launch in 2020, will cost $188 million. This figure includes the cost of the launch vehicle and post-launch operations and data analysis. Principal Investigator Martin Weisskopf of NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, will lead the mission. Ball Aerospace in Broomfield, Colorado, will provide the spacecraft and mission integration. The Italian Space Agency will contribute the polarization sensitive X-ray detectors, which were developed in Italy. NASA's Explorers Program provides frequent, low-cost access to space using principal investigator-led space science investigations relevant to the agency’s astrophysics and heliophysics programs. The program has launched more than 90 missions, including Explorer 1 in 1958, which discovered the Van Allen radiation belts around the Earth, and the Cosmic Background Explorer mission, which led to a Nobel Prize. NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, manages the Explorers Program for the agency's Science Mission Directorate. For more information about the Explorers program, visit: http://explorers.gsfc.nasa.gov For information about NASA, visit: http://www.nasa.gov -end-Portal image: NASA Selects Mission to Study Black Holes, Cosmic X-ray Mysteries Science Categories: Universe

NASA Selects Mission to Study Black Holes, Cosmic X-ray Mysteries

4 January 2017 - 9:10am
NASA has selected a science mission that will allow astronomers to explore, for the first time, the hidden details of some of the most extreme and exotic astronomical objects, such as stellar and supermassive black holes, neutron stars and pulsars.

NASA's Hubble Observations Suggest Underground Ocean on Jupiter's Largest Moon

4 January 2017 - 9:09am

Nearly 500 million miles from the Sun lies a moon orbiting Jupiter that is slightly larger than the planet Mercury and may contain more water than all of Earth's oceans. Temperatures are so cold, though, that water on the surface freezes as hard as rock and the ocean lies roughly 100 miles below the crust. Nevertheless, where there is water there could be life as we know it. Identifying liquid water on other worlds — big or small — is crucial in the search for habitable planets beyond Earth. Though the presence of an ocean on Ganymede has been long predicted based on theoretical models, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope found the best evidence for it. Hubble was used to watch aurorae glowing above the moon's icy surface. The aurorae are tied to the moon's magnetic field, which descends right down to the core of Ganymede. A saline ocean would influence the dynamics of the magnetic field as it interacts with Jupiter's own immense magnetic field, which engulfs Ganymede. Because telescopes can't look inside planets or moons, tracing the magnetic field through aurorae is a unique way to probe the interior of another world.

Join Hubble astronomers during a live Hubble Hangout discussion about Ganymede at 3pm EDT on Thurs., March 12, to learn even more. Visit http://hbbl.us/y6f .

New Year's Fireworks from a Shattered Comet

3 January 2017 - 9:07am
Video Length: 4:07

Earth will pass through a stream of debris from comet 2003 EH1 on January 3, 2017, producing a shower of meteors known as the Quadrantids.

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Window to hell: Io’s strongest volcano changes face as we watch

30 December 2016 - 12:05pm

The innermost moon of Jupiter is in an almost constant state of eruption - and its most persistent volcano, Loki Patera, keeps an unsteady rhythm

Vera Rubin, pioneering astronomer, dies at 88

30 December 2016 - 12:03pm

Astronomer Vera Rubin, whose pioneering work led to the theory of dark matter, dies at 88.