BAA Comet Section : Periodic Comets 300 - 399

Updated 2016 October 12


  • 300P/Catalina
  • 301P/LINEAR-NEAT
  • 302P/Lemmon-PanSTARRS
  • 303P/NEAT
  • 304P/Ory
  • 305P/Skiff
  • 306P/LINEAR
  • 307P/LINEAR
  • 308P/Lagerqvist-Carsenty
  • 309P/LINEAR
  • 310P/Hill
  • 311P/PanSTARRS
  • 312P/NEAT
  • 313P/Gibbs
  • 314P/Montani
  • 315P/LONEOS
  • 316P/LONEOS-Christensen
  • 317P/WISE
  • 318P/McNaught-Hartley
  • 319P/Catalina-McNaught
  • 320P/McNaught
  • 321P/SOHO
  • 322P/SOHO
  • 323P/SOHO
  • 324P/La Sagra
  • 325P/Yang-Gao
  • 326P/Hill
  • 327P/Van Ness
  • 328P/LONEOS-Tucker
  • 329P/LINEAR-Catalina
  • 330P/Catalina
  • 331P/Gibbs
  • 332P/Ikeya-Murakami
  • 333P/LINEAR
  • 334P/NEAT
  • 335P/Gibbs
  • 336P/McNaught
  • 337P/WISE
  • 338P/McNaught
  • 339P/Gibbs
  • 340P/Boattini
  • 341P/Gibbs
  • 342P/SOHO
  • 343P/NEAT-LONEOS
  • P/Read
  • P/LINEAR
  • P/Catalina
  • P/PanSTARRS
  • Comets 1 - 99
  • Comets 100 - 199
  • Comets 200 - 299
  • Comets 300 - 399
  • Not yet numbered objects
  • When observing a comet please try to forget how bright you think the comet should be, what it was when you last viewed it, what other observers think it is or what the ephemeris says it should be.

    The equations for the light curves of comets that are currently visible use only the raw observations and should give a reasonable prediction for the current brightness. If the comet has not yet been observed or has gone from view a correction for aperture is included, so that telescopic observers should expect the comet to be fainter than given by the equation. The correction is about 0.033 per centimetre. Values for the r parameter given in square brackets [ ] are assumed. The form of the light curve is either the standard m = H0 + 5 log d + K0 log r or the linear brightening m = H0 + 5 log d + L0 abs(t - T + D0) where T is the date of perihelion, t the present and D0 an offset, if L0 is +ve the comet brightens towards perihelion and if D0 is +ve the comet is brightest prior to perihelion.


    300P/Catalina = 2005 JQ5 = 2014 G2
    An apparently asteroidal object of 17th magnitude found by the Catalina Sky Survey on 2005 May 6.28 has been found to show cometary features. It reached perihelion at 0.83 au in late July 2005 and has a period of 4.4 years. The comet reached magnitude 10.5.

    The comet was recovered by M. Masek, J. Cerny, J. Ebr, M. Prouza, P. Kubanek, M. Jelinek, K. Honkova and J. Jurysek at the Pierre Auger Observatory, Malarque with the 0.3m reflector on April 9.39. [MPEC 2014-G70, 2014 April 10]. The comet returns to perihelion 0.1 days earlier than predicted.

    The comet can make close approaches to Venus, Earth and Mars. Its last close approach to Earth was at the discovery apparition in 2005, when it came to 0.10 au and in 2036 it will approach to 0.06 au. It will approach within 0.08 au of Mars in 2132 and approached Venus to 0.09 au in 1957.


    301P/LINEAR-NEAT = 2001 BB50 = 2014 K1
    S. Pravdo, K. Lawrence, and E. Helin, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, reported the discovery of an 18th mag comet on 2001 March 20 CCD images taken with the NEAT 1.2-m reflector at Haleakala, the object showing a short eastward tail, a nuclear condensation of size < 3", and a coma diameter of about 10". T. B. Spahr, Minor Planet Center, linked this object first with an object reported as asteroidal by LINEAR on March 18 (m_2 = 19.5) and then to the LINEAR object 2001 BB_50, observed on January 21 and 26 (MPS 25734). Following posting on the NEO Confirmation Page, C. Jacques, Belo Horizonte, Brazil, also reported a 10" coma and m_1 = 18.6 on CCD images taken on March 21 (0.3-m reflector). Full astrometry and the orbital elements appear on MPEC 2001-F26. [IAUC 7601, 2001 March 21] The comet has a perihelion distance of 2.35 au and is intrinsically faint. Its period is 13.6 years.

    2001 BB50 (P/LINEAR-NEAT) was recovered in images from PanSTARRS taken on 2014 May 17.28, with earlier images taken at the SATINO remote observatory, Haute Province on 2014 March 1.93. The comet will return to perihelion 1.76 days earlier than predicted and has a period of 13.7 years.


    302P/Lemmon-PanSTARRS = 2007 RJ236 = 2014 K2
    A 21st magnitude comet discovered in PanSTARRS 1 images taken with the 1.8m Ritchey-Chretien on April 29.36, was linked to asteroid 2007 RJ236 discovered during the Mt Lemmon survey on 2007 September 13.30. It was also linked to observations made by the Purple Mountain Observatory in 2007 August. [MPEC 2014-K28, 2014 May 23] The comet is at perihelion at 3.3 au in 2016 April and has a period of 8.86 years.
    303P/NEAT = 2003 U3 = 2014 L1
    NEAT discovered an 19th mag comet on 2003 October 22.29. It was past perihelion at 2.5 au in late April and had a period around 11.5 years.

    K. Lawrence, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, reports the discovery by the NEAT project of a 19th magnitude comet on 2003 October 22.29. Observations by J. Young at Table Mountain on October 23.2 UT show a 3" coma with a short, broad, fan-shaped tail about 8" long spanning p.a. 255-285 deg. [IAUC 8230, 2003 October 23]

    2003 U3 (P/NEAT) was recovered in images taken at the ESA Optical Ground Station in Tenerife with the 1.0m reflector by P Ruiz. The comet will return to perihelion 1.80 days earlier than predicted and has a period of 11.4 years.    [MPEC 2014-L12, 2014 June 2]


    304P/Ory = 2008 Q2 = 2014 L4
    An 18th magnitude apparently asteroidal object discovered by Michel Ory of Delemont, Switzerland, on CCD images obtained with a 0.61-m f/3.9 reflector at Vicques was found to show cometary characteristics after posting on the NEOCP. The comet has a period of 5.8 years with perihelion at 1.4 au. It was at a perihelic opposition.

    Michel Ory is a Swiss amateur astronomer and president of the Société jurassienne d'astronomie, which has a well equipped observatory in the foothills of the Jura.

    The comet passed 0.3 au from Jupiter in November 2005, before which the perihelion distance was a little larger.

    2008 Q2 was recovered by Hidetaka Sato in images taken with the iTelescope 0.51m astrograph at Siding Spring on 2014 June 2.79. The comet is very close to the prediction by B. G. Marsden on MPC 65935. It has a period of 5.8 years.  [MPEC 2014-M10, CBET 3906, 2014 June 18]


    305P/Skiff = 2004 V1 = 2014 N1
    Brian Skiff discovered an 18th magnitude comet on LONEOS images taken with the 0.59-m Schmidt on November 4.08. Prediscovery LINEAR images showed that it ws approaching perihelion at 1.42 au in early December and had a period of 10.0 years.

    B. Skiff, Lowell Observatory, reports his discovery of a comet on LONEOS images obtained on Nov. 4.1 UT with the 0.59-m Schmidt telescope, the object showing a moderately condensed coma of diameter 25" and a weak tail 50" long in p.a. 75 deg. Following posting on the "NEO Confirmation Page", B. L. Stevens (Las Cruces, NM, 0.3-m Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope) reports that his CCD images taken on Nov. 4.2 show a 30" tail in p.a. 55 deg. [IAUC 8426, 2004 November 4]

    Gareth Williams found images of 2004 V1 (P/Skiff) in images taken taken with the PanSTARRS 1 1.8m Ritchey-Chretien on July 3.51. The comet will return to perihelion 0.32 days earlier than predicted and has a period of 9.9 years.  [CBET 3918, MPEC 2014-N43, 2014 July 7]


    306P/LINEAR = 2003 O3 = 2014 M5
    A 19th magnitude comet was discovered by LINEAR on 2003 July 30.39, although other CCD observers estimated it at 18th magnitude. It was confirmed as cometary by Peter Birtwhistle amongst others. The comet reached perihelion at 1.25 au in mid August. It passed 0.3 au from Jupiter in 1979 November and the period is 5.5 years.

    An apparently asteroidal object reported by LINEAR, and posted on the NEO Confirmation Page, was found to be apparently cometary on CCD images taken by P. Birtwhistle (Great Shefford, U.K., 0.30-m reflector; very faint tail about 10" long in p.a. approximately 270-280 deg on July 31.10 and Aug. 2.08 UT; mag 18.1 and coma diameter about 5" on Aug. 2.08), by J. Ticha and M. Tichy (Klet, 1.06-m KLENOT telescope; diffuse with a wide tail in p.a. 260 deg on Aug. 3.01), and by J. McGaha (near Tucson, AZ; possible tail spike 5" long in p.a. 300 deg on Aug. 3.38 with a 0.30-m reflector; possible fan-shaped tail 5" long in p.a. 260 deg on Aug. 5.33 with a 0.62-m reflector). The preliminary orbital elements indicate that the comet passed 0.3 au from Jupiter in Nov. 1979. [IAUC 8174, 2003 August 5]

    2003 O3 (P/LINEAR) was recovered by Hidetaka Sato in images taken with the iTelescope 0.51m astrograph at Siding Spring on June 21.77. The comet was missed at its 2009 return and is close to the prediction in the 2014 ICQ Handbook. It has a period of 5.5 years with perihelion at 1.3 au.  [MPEC 2014-N76, CBET 3922, 2014 July 14]


    307P/LINEAR = 2000 QJ46 = 2014 O1
    A 19th magnitude asteroid found by LINEAR on 2000 August 24.27 was found in 2005 October to show a coma and tail on archival Sloan Digital Sky Survey images taken just over a week later. The comet has a 14.4 year period, with perihelion at 1.93 au in 2000 December.

    A team of observers at the European Space Agency's Optical Ground Station recovered 2000 QJ46 (P/LINEAR) with the 1.0m reflector on 2014 July 25.15. The indicated correction to the prediction by B. G. Marsden on MPC 75735 is Delta(T) = -0.24 day.  [CBET 3923, MPEC 2014-O44, 2014 July 27] The comet has a period of 14 years and reaches perihelion at 1.9 au in December.


    308P/Lagerqvist-Carsenty = 1997 T3 = 2014 O2
    Uri Carsenty and Andreas Nathues, of the DLR Institute of Planetary Exploration, Berlin discovered a 19th mag cometary object on 1997 October 5.1 during the course of the Uppsala-DLR Trojan Survey, in collaboration with C-I Lagerkvist, S Mottola and G Hahn. [IAUC 6754, 1997 October 7]. It is in a distant elliptical orbit with a period of 19.7 years. The comet was not named until January 1998, when it was named after the discoverer and person who found that it was a cometary object [IAUC 6811, 1998 January 23]

    A team of observers at the European Space Agency's Optical Ground Station recovered 1997 T3 (P/Lagerqvist-Carsenty) with the 1.0m reflector on 2014 July 29.08. The indicated correction to the prediction by B. G. Marsden on MPC 79348 is Delta(T) = -1.28 days. [CBET 3925, MPEC 2014-O65, 2014 July 30] The comet has a period of 17 years and reaches perihelion at 4.2 au in 2015 May.


    309P/LINEAR = 2005 Q4 = 2014 Q4
    A 19th magnitude, asteroidal object discovered by LINEAR on August 31.40 and posted on the NEOCP was shown to have a tail by J Lacruz (Madrid) and J Young (Table Mountain, USA). The comet reaches perihelion at 1.75 AU at the end of September. It is in an eliptical orbit with a period of 9.4 years.

    Krisztian Sarneczky recovered 2005 Q4 (P/LINEAR) with a 0.6m Schmidt on 2014 August 23.00, with PanSTARRS images from the same night later found by Gareth Williams. The indicated correction to the prediction by Gareth Williams on MPC 75706 is Delta(T) = -0.26 day.  [CBET 3937, MPEC 2014-Q39, 2014 August 24] The comet has a period of 9.4 years and reaches perihelion at 1.7 au in 2015 February.


    310P/Hill = 2006 S6 = 2014 Q5
    This was the second of two comet discoveries by Rik Hill on the same night, 2006 September 28. It was of 18th magnitude. and found on September 28.40. It was at perihelion at 2.4 au in mid 2006 October.

    Krisztian Sarneczky recovered 2006 S6 (P/Hill) with a 0.6m Schmidt at the Piszkesteto Station of Konkoly Observatory on 2014 August 24.98. The indicated correction to the prediction by Gareth Williams on MPC 79348 is Delta(T) = -0.32 day.  [CBET 3938, MPEC 2014-Q53, 2014 August 26] The comet has a period of 8.5 years and reaches perihelion at 2.4 au in 2015 April.


    311P/PanSTARRS = 2013 P5
    Pan-STARRS discovered a 21st magnitude comet on 2013 August 15.50.  [MPEC 2013-Q37, 2013 August 27]  It reached perihelion at 1.9 au in 2014 April and has a low eccentricity and a very short period of around 3.2 years.  There are some similarities between its orbit and that of Flora group asteroids and it is probably another example of a Main Belt Comet. The HST took images of it on September 10 and 23, showing a complex tail structure that might be linked to rotation rate.  It was numbered in 2014 once observations extended over a complete orbit.
    312P/NEAT = 2001 Q11 = 2014 R2
    In March 2010 Maik Meyer, Limburg, Germany, discovered a 19th magnitude comet on images obtained by the NEAT project on three nights at Palomar and on five nights at Haleakala during August - December 2001. The August 18.47 Palomar discovery-night images show a 21" tail in p.a. 256 deg, and there was a 0'.2 tail in p.a. 264 deg on the August 22 Haleakala frames. The August 18 observations were reported (though not as being cometary) by NEAT at the time (mag 18.6-18.7), but the object was never followed up; likewise for four LONEOS observations (mag 17.9) on October 24. The comet was at perihelion in 2001 June and has a period of around 6.2 years. Searches of relevant frames by Meyer and others have so far failed to show the comet at its return in 2007. [IAUC 9129, 2010 March 19]

    2001 Q11 (P/NEAT) was recovered in images taken by Eric Christensen at Mt Lemmon with the 1.5m reflector on September 6.45.  After the object was posted on the PCCP, Hidetaka Sato was able to find the comet in images taken on July 28.82.  The comet will return to perihelion 0.68 days earlier than predicted and has a period of 6.4 years.  It was discovered by Maik Meyer in 2010 in images taken in 2001, though no images could be found from the 2007 return. [CBET 3971, MPEC 2014-R91, 2014 September 12]


    313P/Gibbs = 2003 S10 = 2014 S4
    Alex Gibbs discovered a 19th magnitude comet on September 24.31 on images taken during the Catalina Sky Survey with the 0.68m Schmidt. Subsequently pre-discovery images were found in Sky Survey data. [CBET 3991, MPEC 2014-S115, 2014 September 27]. 

    With an improved orbit, it was linked to an object found in LONEOS images from September and November 2003 and was designated 2003 S10 for that return. [MPEC 2014-U24, 2014 October 20]

    The comet was at perihelion at 2.4 au in 2014 August and has a period of 5.6 years.


    314P/Montani = 1997 G1 = 2014 U1
    1997 G1 P/Montani was announced on IAUC 6622. It was a 19th mag object discovered by Joe Montani of the Spacewatch team. It is a distant object, with a perihelion distance of 4.3 AU and a period of around 20 years.

    1997 G1 (P/Montani) was recovered on October 13.31 at the Steward Observatory, Kitt Peak by Terry Bressi and A F Tubbiolo with the 0.9m reflector.


    315P/LONEOS = 2004 VR8 = 2013 V6
    An apparently asteroidal 18th magnitude object discovered by LONEOS on 2004 November 3.35 and shown in the list of unusual asteroids, was found to be cometary by other observers. It reached perihelion at 2.38 au in early September 2005 and has a period of 10.7 years.

    An apparently asteroidal object discovered by LONEOS, designated 2004 VR_8 (cf. MPS 118755, MPEC 2004-V48), was found to show a 10"-diameter coma and a tail 16" long in p.a. 140 deg on R-band CCD observations taken by C. W. Hergenrother (Lunar and Planetary Laboratory) with the 1.54-m Kuiper reflector at Catalina on November 19.3 UT. Also, A. Nakamura (Kuma, Ehime, Japan) reports that 240-s unfiltered CCD frames taken with a 0.60-m reflector on December 8.55 and 9.55 shows to object's image to be slightly 'softer' than other field stars of similar brightness, and a possible very faint tail is visible to the southeast. [IAUC 8451, 2004 December 10]

    A possible recovery of 2004 VR8 (P/LONEOS) with the 3.5m Apache Point reflector on 2013 November 6.15 was confirmed with the same telescope on 2014 December 8.09. The indicated correction to the prediction by G. V. Willliams on MPC 84327 is Delta(T) = -0.71 day. [CBET 4038, MPEC 2014-Y45, 2014 December 24]

    The comet approaches Jupiter every few orbits, most recently on 2007 August 22 when it passed 0.40 au from the planet. The encounter made small changes to the orbital elements and increased the orbital period to 11.2 years.


    316P/LONEOS-Christensen = 2005 RV25 = 2014 U5
    Eric Christensen discovered an 18th magnitude comet with the 0.5-m Uppsala Schmidt in the course of the Siding Spring Survey on 2005 October 22.25, which was confirmed by Peter Birtwhistle and Richard Miles and Rob McNaught. It was then linked to an asteroid discovered by LONEOS on September 11. It reached perihelion at 3.60 AU in 2006 November and has a period of 9.0 years.

    2005 RV25 (P/LONEOS-Christensen) was recovered on 2014 October 22.98 at the ESA Optical Ground Station, Tenerife by D Abreau with the 1.0m reflector. The recovery was confirmed by J D Armstrong with the Faulkes-North   [CBET 40nn, MPEC 2014-W19, 2014 November 19]  The comet has perihelion at 3.6 au in 2015 October and a period of 8.9 years. The perihelion date was around xx days earlier than those published for the equinox of perihelion.


    317P/WISE = 2010 K2 = 2015 B3
    An object noted in images from the the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) satellite on May 27.18 and posted on the NEOCP was found to show cometary characteristics Jim Scotti with the Spacewatch 1.8-m reflector and Alan C. Gilmore and Pamela M. Kilmartin with the Mount John 1.0-m reflector. Further inspection of the WISE images also showed a coma and tail. The comet was at perihelion at 1.2 au in 2010 July and had a period of 5.0 years.

    PanSTARRS recovered P/2010 K2 in images taken with the 1.8m Ritchey-Chretien on 2015 January 26.46, with further images on March 18.35. The comet now has a period of 5.1 years and will reach perihelion 3.2 days earlier than previously predicted. It passed 0.71 au from Jupiter in 2012 November.


    318P/McNaught-Hartley = 1994 N2 = 2014 M6
    Malcolm Hartley took a 110 minute exposure on 1994 July 6.6 with the 1.2-m UK Schmidt Telescope at Siding Spring and found a 16m comet, which was also present on a plate taken the night before. [IAUC 6014, 1994 July 7]. The comet was approaching opposition and nearly stationary on the border of Grus and Microscopium. It proved to be a relatively distant short period comet with a period of 21 years and a perihelion distance of 2.5 au.  Aphelion is beyond the orbit of Saturn and there have been no recent approaches to it or Jupiter.

    1994 N2 (P/McNaught-Hartley) was recovered by PanSTARRS in images taken with the 1.8m Ritchey-Chretien on 2014 June 29.32, though it took further images taken at the MASTER-SAAO Observatory, Sutherland with the 0.4m reflector on 2015 March 31.1 to confirm the recovery. The comet reaches perihelion at 2.45 au in October and has a period of 20.6 years.

    5 visual observations received so far suggest a preliminary light curve of m = 9.0 + 5 log d + [10] log r


    319P/Catalina-McNaught = 2008 S1 = 2015 G1
    Rob McNaught discovered a 17th magnitude comet on September 17.41 on CCD images taken with the 0.5-m Uppsala Schmidt telescope at Siding Spring Observatory. Brian Marsden subsequently linked the comet to asteroid 2008 JK, discovered during the Catalina Sky Survey on May 2.34. The comet was therefore renamed from McNaught to Catalina-McNaught. The improved orbit shows that the comet approached to 0.18 au from Jupiter in 1990 August, before which its perihelion distance was 1.5 au. The comet was near perihelion at discovery.

    An object found in infra-red images from the NEOWISE satellite on 2015 April 5.67 was identified as the return of 2008 S1 (P/Catalina-McNaught) by Gareth Williams.  The indicated correction to the prediction on MPC 79350 is Delta(T) = -0.11 day.  The comet reaches perihelion at 1.20 au in 2015 July and has a period of 6.8 years.


    320P/McNaught = 2004 R1 = 2015 HC10
    Rob McNaught discovered an 18th magnitude comet on CCD images taken by himself with the 0.5-m Uppsala Schmidt at Siding Spring on September 2.42. Sadly although the NEO confirmation page asking for further observations suggested that the object was -0.4, this was not the case! Further observations showed that the object was a short period comet, with perihelion at 0.99 au in late August. The period was 5.49 years.

    R. H. McNaught reports his discovery of a comet on CCD images taken by himself with the 0.5-m Uppsala Schmidt telescope at Siding Spring on Sept. 2.4 UT, when the object was diffuse with a hint of a tail to the southeast. Images taken by McNaught with the Siding Spring 1.0-m f/8 reflector on Sept. 4.4 show the comet to be diffuse with a 10" coma and a tail 15" long in p.a. 110 deg. [IAUC 8398, 2004 September 4]

    J. Young (Table Mountain, 0.6-m reflector + CCD) reports that images taken in poor seeing (and at low altitude) on Sept. 6.13- 6.16 UT show a coma diameter of about 5". Additional CCD images by R. H. McNaught with the Siding-Spring 1.0-m reflector on Sept. 6.5 show an ill-defined center of brightness that is elongated in the direction of tail (and of the comet's motion). [IAUC 8400, 2004 September 6]

    An apparently asteroidal object found on images taken with the Cerro Tololo 4-m reflector by L. Allen and D. James (measured by F. Valdes) was posted on the Minor Planet Center's NEOCP webpage and then announced on MPEC 2015-H82 with the minor-planet designation 2015 HC10. Gareth Williams, F. Manca, and P. Sicoli then each identified it with comet P/2004 R1. The comet was missed at its 2010 return. The indicated correction to the prediction by S. Nakano on MPC 79350 is Delta(T) = +5.0 days. 


    321P/SOHO = 1997 J6 = 2001 D1 = 2004 X7 = 2008 S2 = 2012 M2
    In 2009, following the linkage between 2001 D1, 2004 X7 and 2008 S2, Rainer Kracht revisited the archival SOHO C2 images from 1997 and was able to secure a positive identification of the comet.

    Brian Marsden published a linked orbit on MPEC 2009-H56 [2009 April 26] and noted:

    The above computation, using nongravitational parameters A1 = +0.0002, A2 = -0.0002, is based on work by R. Kracht. Despite the poor quality of the SOHO observations, a purely gravitational computation from the four apparitions appears to leave significantly systematic residuals.
    This suggests that the object really is a comet, and should therefore be numbered as such.  The comet was again observed from SOHO in 2012, eventually being designated 2012 M2 in 2015 May and then subsequently numbered.
    322P/SOHO = 1999 R1 = 2003 R5 = 2007 R5 = 2011 R4
    A Kracht II group comet reported from SOHO C2 imagery by Bo Zhou on 2007 September 10.76 was the return of the comet predicted by Sebastian Hoenig, confirming the identity 1999 R1 = 2003 R5. The preliminary time of perihelion was September 11.1, compared to the prediction of September 11.3. Following the precedent of comets 1P, 2P and 27P a suggestion is that the comet should be re-named comet Hoenig. An alternative view is that others have also suggested possible linkages between the SOHO comet groups, eg Rainer Kracht, Brian Marsden and Maik Meyer and that deciding on who should get precedence will be difficult. The CBAT were reluctant to number it because they were not convinced that it is a comet.  The comet was again observed from SOHO in 2011, eventually being designated 2011 R4 in 2015 May and subsequently numbered as 322P/SOHO.  It was again observed in 2015, but not given a further designation.
    323P/SOHO = 1999 X3 = 2004 E2 = 2008 K10 = 2012 Q2
    This was a non-group comet discovered in C2 images by Rainer Kracht on 2008 May 31. The original orbit on MPEC 2008-O16 [2008 July 22], gave a retrograde orbit. On the basis of an identification by Rainer Kracht, Brian Marsden has computed a linked orbit with 2004 E2 and 1999 X3, which had a period of 4.2 years and a low inclination. Brian Marsden commented on MPEC 2008-S49 [2008 September 24]
    The identification is by R. Kracht. The observations, all obtained with the LASCO C2 coronagraph, are on MPEC 2006-L20, 2004-M42 and 2008-O16. The The object passed 0.058 AU from the earth on 2000 Jan. 13, 0.032 AU from Mars on 2004 May 19 and 1.17 AU from Jupiter on 2003 Feb. 1.
    The comet was again observed from SOHO in 2012, eventually being designated 2012 Q2 in 2015 May and subsequently numbered as 323P/SOHO.
    324P/La Sagra = 2010 R2 = 2015 K3
    The La Sagra team (Spain) discovered another comet on 2010 September 14.87 and were able to find pre-discovery observations from August 13.0. The object was confirmed as cometary by Peter Birtwhistle and fellow astrometrists. The comet was around 19th magnitude. It has a period of 5.5 years and was at perihelion at 2.6 au in late June. The object appears to be another main-belt comet, similar to 133P = (7968) Elst-Pizarro.

    The comet was recovered by S. S. Sheppard with the Magellan-Baade telescope in images taken in 2015 March and April, but the recovery was first reported by Jim Scotti in images taken with the Spacewatch 1.8-m telescope at Kitt Peak on 2015 May 22.43. The indicated correction to the prediction by S. Nakano is Delta(T) = -0.03 day.  [CBET 4107, MPEC 2015-K101, 2015 May 26].  The Magellan-Baade images showed a tail, which was confirmed by CFH images, according to IAUC 9276 [2015 August 3].  This notes that the object is the fourth main belt comet to show recurrent activity when near perihelion after being inactive at aphelion. 


    325P/Yang-Gao = 2009 L2 = 2015 J4
    Rui Yang, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China and Xing Gao, Urumqi, Xinjiang, China discovered a new comet on several survey images (limiting mag about 15) taken by Gao in the course of the Xingming Comet Survey using a Canon 350D camera (+ 10.7-cm f/2.8 camera lens) at Mt. Nanshan on June 15.81. The object, of 14th magnitude, but perhaps brighter visually, was identified as cometary by Yang. It was confirmed by several amateur CCD observers. [IAUC 9052, 2009 June 16]. The comet was around a month past perihelion at 1.3 au at a very favourable opposition and has a period of 6.3 years. This is the second discovery by the Xingming Survey, the first being 2008 C1 (Chen-Gao)

    Hidetaka Sato recovered 2009 L2 with the 0.51m iTelescope at Siding Spring on 2015 May 11.38 with confirming images taken on June 9 and 10. [MPEC 2015-L28, 2015 June 10].


    326P/Hill = 2007 V2 = 2015 P1
    BAA Member, Rik Hill discovered a 19th magnitude comet on 2007 November 9.30 in images taken during the Mt Lemmon survey with the 1.5m reflector. The comet has a period of around 8.2 years and perihelion was at 2.8 au in 2007 July.

    Krisztian Sarneczky recovered 2007 V2 (P/Hill) with the 0.6m Schmidt at Piszkesteto Station of Konkoly Observatory on August 8.02. [CBET 4134, MPEC 2015-P21, 2015 August 10].


    327P/Van Ness = 2002 Q1 = 2015 P2
    Michael E. Van Ness, Lowell Observatory, reported his discovery of a 17th mag comet with a moderately condensed 24" coma and a fan-shaped tail about 200" long in p.a. 270 deg on LONEOS images taken on 2002 August 17.44. The cometary nature was confirmed by several other CCD astrometric observers on August 18, who all reported a generally diffuse coma with diameter about 14"-25"; several also noted a tail about 25"-120" long in p.a. 260-270 deg. [IAUC 7956, 2002 August 19] It was periodic with a period of around 6.6 years and was past perihelion.

    A possible comet found by PanSTARRS on August 6.39 was tentatively identified as 2002 Q1 (P/Van Ness) by Gareth Williams. Krisztian Sarneczky independently recovered the comet on images taken with the 0.6m Schmidt at Piszkesteto Station of Konkoly Observatory on August 10.87 by A Sodor. The indicated correction to the prediction by S. Nakano on MPC 79352 is Delta(T) = +1.5 days.  [CBET 4135, MPEC 2015-P24, 2015 August 11].


    328P/LONEOS-Tucker = 1998 QP54 = 2015 S1
    1998 QP54 LONEOS-Tucker was identified as a comet by Roy A. Tucker (Tucson, AZ) whilst carrying out a CCD asteroid-astrometry program with a 0.36-m f/11 Schmidt-Cassegrain at the Goodricke-Pigott Observatory. G. V. Williams, Minor Planet Center, then identified the comet with 1998 QP54, which had been reported by E. Bowell (observer W. D. Ferris, measurer B. W. Koehn) as an apparently quite ordinary minor planet in the course of LONEOS, the Lowell Observatory Near-Earth Object Search. Williams then also identified single-night observations (also on 1998 August 28) by LINEAR as belonging to the same object. Information about the object was then placed in The NEO Confirmation Page. In response, J. Ticha reported observations made at the Klet Observatory that showed a faint coma (diameter 17") and a 35" tail in p.a. 226 deg, and L. Sarounova reported from the Ondrejov Observatory on a narrow tail 5' long in p.a. 135 deg and only a small coma. Observations were also reported by T. Spahr from the Catalina Sky Survey. The comet was named on IAUC 7024 [1998 October 6]. The comet is of short period, and it made a close approach to Jupiter early in 1992. Nick James was able to image it on 1998 October 14.

    Alex Gibbs discovered an 18th magnitude comet during the Catalina Sky Survey with the 0.68m Schmidt on 2015 September 30.13. He suggested that it might be a recovery of P/LONEOS-Tucker, which had been missed at its 2007 return. Other astrometrists, including Peter Birtwhistle confirmed the comet, and Gareth Williams computed a linked orbit. The correction to the predicted time of perihelion in published elements for the return was -1.9 days. [CBET 4146, MPEC 2015-T06, 2015 October 5]


    329P/LINEAR-Catalina = 2003 WC7 = 2015 T1
    LINEAR discovered a 20th magnitude object on 2003 November 18.14 which was observed on two nights. It was independently discovered by the Catalina Sky Survey on 2004 January 31.14 and posted on the NEO confirmation page. Other observers then noted a coma and tail. The object was in an 11.8 year orbit with perihelion at 1.65 au.

    An apparently asteroidal object was discovered by the LINEAR project on 2003 November 18 (observed on only two nights) and given the designation 2003 WC_7 (MPS 91151). The object was discovered independently on January 31 by the Catalina Sky Survey and then posted on the NEO Confirmation Page. As a result, it has been found to show cometary appearance on CCD exposures taken by J. Young (Table Mountain, 0.6-m reflector, Feb. 1.15 UT; very diffuse coma of mag 17.5 and diameter 5", very little central condensation, and a straight, narrow 10" tail in p.a. 345 deg) and by G. J. Garradd and R. H. McNaught (Siding Spring, 1.0-m f/8 reflector, Feb. 1.46; coma diameter 3".5 in 2".5 seeing; no obvious tail visible in five co- added 40-s frames). [IAUC 8280, 2004 February 1]

    PanSTARRS discovered what was thought to be an unknown 20th magnitude comet on October 10.53, though the discovery report did suggest that it might be a recovery of 2003 WC7 (P/LINEAR-Catalina). Further astrometry confirmed the identification. The indicated correction to the prediction by G. V. Williams on MPC 79352 is Delta(T) = +0.70 day; the indicated correction to the prediction by S. Nakano in the ICQ's 2015 Comet Handbook is Delta(T) = +0.37 day. CBET 4148, MPEC 2015-T72, 2015 October 12]. The indicated ICQ Handbook does not appear to have any functional web links and is apparently not on the internet.


    330P/Catalina = 1999 V1 = 2015 U1
    C. W. Hergenrother, Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, reported the discovery of another comet of 18th magnitude by the Catalina Sky Survey on 1999 November 5.44. [IAUC 7302, 1999 November 7] The comet was close to perihelion at 2.9 au and had a period of 16.8 years.

    Krisztian Sarneczky recovered 1999 V1 on 2015 October 22.98 with the 0.6m Schmidt at Piszkesteto station of Konkoly Observatory. Following the observation he was able to identify images from September 13. The indicated correction to the prediction by Gareth Williams on MPC 84326 is Delta(T) = -0.74 day. [CBET 4155, MPEC 2015-U49, 2015 October 24]


    331P/Gibbs = 2012 F5
    Alex Gibbs discovered a 20th magnitude comet on March 22.29 on images taken during the Mt Lemmon Survey with the 1.5m reflector. The comet has a period of around 5.2 years and was at perihelion at 2.9 au in 2010 March. Given the interval since perihelion, it may be in outburst.  It was numbered in 2016.
    332P/Ikeya-Murakami = 2010 V1 = 2015 Y2
    A visual comet was discovered by Japanese amateur observers, Kaoru Ikeya (Mori-machi, Shuchi-gun, Shizuoka-ken; 25-cm reflector at 39x; diffuse with some condensation; coma diameter 1' on November 2.831 and 2' on November 3.812) and by Shigeki Murakami (Toukamachi, Niigata-ken; 46-cm reflector at 78x; coma diameter 4' with a 2' tail in p.a. 90 deg on November 3.801; moving eastward at approximately 2'/hr). It is 47 years since the first discovery by Ikeya (1963 A1).

    The comet was magnitude 8.5 at discovery by Ikeya, and 8 the following day. It seemed to be brightening rapidly, as visual observation by Juan Jose Gonzalez on November 4.2 put it as bright as 7.6 in 10x50B. This may indicate that the comet is undergoing an outburst. This suggestion is partially confirmed by Ikeya's failure to spot the comet when he searched the discovery area on November 1.8. The coma expanded, and the comet had faded to around 12th magnitude by early December, much faster than a standard light curve would suggest.

    The orbit is elliptic, with the comet at perihelion at 1.6 au in mid October and a period of around 5.3 years, as first suggested by Hirohisa Sato. Maik Meyer noted that there were similarities with the orbit of P/2010 B2, however once the orbit of 2010 V1 became better known Hirohisa Sato was able to show that the two orbits did not converge when computed back in time.

    A paper by Masateru Ishiguro et al suggests that the outburst took place between 2010 October 31 and November 3 and was largely comprised of dust.  It was smaller than the outburst of 17P/Holmes, although the energy per unit mass was comparable.  They suggest crystallisation of amorphous water as a likely cause.

    A 21st magnitude comet discovered in PanSTARRS 1 images taken with the 1.8m Ritchey-Chretien on 2015 December 31.52, and briefly on the PCCP, was identified with 2010 V1 (P/Ikeya-Murakami).  A secondary component was also discovered.  The comet returns to perihelion in 2016 March at 1.57 au and has a period of 5.4 years.  The indicated correction to the prediction by Gareth Williams on MPEC 2013-O31 is Delta(T) = +7.0 day.  [CBET 4230, MPEC 2016-A10, 2016 January 2]  The secondary component was designated 2010 V1-B [CBET 4231, MPEC 2016-A36, 2016 January 5], though there were no reports of it at that return.  The MPEC orbit for the secondary uses 435 observations, compared to 399 for the primary, both going back to 2010 November 3.  The two orbits are slightly different.  An orbit for a  tertiary component, designated 2010 V1-C, was published on January 26 and again quoted the use of observations back to 2010.  This MPEC also gave observations of a fourth component.  An orbit for a  fifth component, designated 2010 V1-E, was published on February 5, and a sixth, 2010 V1-F on February 9; again both quoted the use of observations back to 2010.  Orbits for further components, G, H, I and J have now been published.

    Calculations by Zdenek Sekanina originally suggested that component B was the primary, and that component A separated at the last return, probably during the major outburst which began around 2010 November 1.  The tails of the two components lie in different directions, with that of component A in the orbital plane and composed of debris, whilst that of component B is closer to the anti-solar direction.  Further observations, including of a further component, D, now suggest that C is the main body as Zdenek Sekanina notes in CBET 4250 [2016 February 3].

    Z. Sekanina, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, writes that recent developments (cf. MPEC 2016-B77) suggest that the 2010 outburst had more severe consequences for the comet's evolution than to accompany a single fragmentation event.  It triggered a fragmentation process that continued over an extended period of time after the outburst (and apparently is still continuing) -- a fairly common phenomenon among split comets that is referred to as "cascading fragmentation" (e.g., Sekanina 2002, Ap.J. 566, 577).  As already pointed out on CBET 4235, fragment A is not a primary component.  Since component B was the only other fragment known by Jan. 4, it was the candidate for the primary due to its location, but not by its very diffuse appearance.  The subsequent detection of fragment C (MPEC 2016-B77), about 12"-13" east of component B on Jan. 8 and 15"-16" on Jan. 11-19, resolved this ambiguity: nucleus C is the primary, the presumably most-massive piece -- though barely active until several days ago -- of the pre-outburst parent comet, unless yet another persistent fragment should still be detected to the east of component C.  The computations suggest that companion A separated from the parent most probably in early November 2012 (with an uncertainty of +/- 2 months). at a rate of 0.36 +/- 0.04 m/s, and was subjected to a differential nongravitational deceleration of 5.2 +/- 0.6 units of 10^{-5} the solar gravitational acceleration.  This solution fits the 12 most consistent offsets of A from C between Jan. 8 and 29 moderately better than a solution forcing the fragmentation time to coincide with the time of the 2010 outburst; it is suggested that component A should survive beyond the 2016 perihelion.  The histories of companions B (probably a cluster of sub-fragments) and D cannot as yet be determined with confidence, except that these objects are likely to be more recent and less massive products of the fragmentation process than companion A.  For companion B, a very tentative solution, based only on the observations Jan. 11-29, suggests that it may have split off in the second half of 2013 or the first half of 2014.  The observations of B from Jan. 8 leave systematic residuals of 2" to 4" from this solution, and a more recent origin of B is plausible.  It is possible that the Jan. 8 astrometric positions of B refer instead to D, in which case component D would have separated only in mid-October 2015, some 150 days before perihelion and, being subjected to a deceleration of about 25 units, would be a short-lived fragment. 

    333P/LINEAR = 2007 VA85
    This highly unusual object was discovered by LINEAR with the 1.0m reflector on 2007 November 4.09.  [MPEC 2007-V73, 2007 November 9, 5-day orbit]. It has a retrograde orbit with a period of 8.6 years and perihelion was at 1.10 au at the end of 2007 July.  In the current orbit it can approach to within 0.25 au of Jupiter and 0.17 au of the Earth. The object has the shortest known retrograde orbit and showed no sign of cometary activity at the 2007 return.

    Cometary activity was detected at the 2016 return, though the comet has not yet been given a designation for this return.  Jose Gonzalez observed it in early March at 11th magnitude, considerably brighter than expected.

    4 observation received so far suggest a preliminary  uncorrected light curve of m = 10.6 + 5 log d + [20] log r .  


    334P/NEAT = 2001 F1 = 2016 A4
    E. F. Helin, S. Pravdo, and K. Lawrence, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, reported the discovery of a mag 20 comet with a faint tail about 40" long toward the west-northwest on CCD images taken with the NEAT 1.2-m reflector at Haleakala on 2001 March 24.42. Additional observations, together with orbital elements (T = 2001 Jan. 21, q = 4.3 AU, i = 19 deg, P = 15.4 yr) by B. G. Marsden, were given on MPEC 2001-F51. The object appeared diffuse on March 28.5 UT CCD images taken by G. J. Garradd, Loomberah, N.S.W. (0.45-m f/5.4 reflector). CCD observations by M. Tichy and M. Kocer at Klet (0.57-m f/5.2 reflector) on March 29.0 show a diffuse 10" coma. P. G. Comba, Prescott, AZ, reports that CCD images taken with a 0.46-m f/4.5 reflector on March 29.3 show a tail in p.a. 285 deg. [IAUC 7604, 2001 March 29]

    The comet was independently recovered at the Piszkesteto Station of Konkoly Observatory on 2016 January 7.90 and at the European Space Agency's Optical Ground Station, Tenerife on January 10.10. [CBET 4237, MPEC 2016-A105, 2016 January 11] The indicated correction to the prediction by S. Nakano in the ICQ's 2014 Comet Handbook is Delta(T) = -0.36 day.


    335P/Gibbs = 2008 Y2 = 2016 A9
    Alex R Gibbs discovered an 18th magnitude comet during the Catalina Sky Survey with the 0.68m Schmidt on 2008 December 31.37. Several observers confirmed the cometary nature. The comet was at perihelion at 1.6 au in late January and has a period of 6.8 years.

    The comet was recovered at the European Space Agency's Optical Ground Station, Tenerife on 2016 January 10.26. [CBET 4253, MPEC 2016-C42, 2016 February 5] The comet was close to the predicted orbit.


    336P/McNaught = 2006 G1 = 2016 B2
    Rob McNaught discovered another comet, during the course of the Siding Spring Survey, on 2006 April 5.70. The object was 18th magnitude and reached perihelion at 2.6 au in mid August. Further observations confirmed that it was a short period comet, with period of 11 years.

    Gareth Williams found astrometry of 2006 G1 in PanSTARRS data from 2016 January 18.57 and February 14. The comet reaches perihelion 0.1 days earlier than predicted. [CBET 4258, MPEC 2016-C201, 2016 February 15] (Note the very large number of MPECs issued in the first half of February !)


    337P/WISE = 2010 N1 = 2016 GE216
    A comet was discovered in images from the the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) satellite on 2010 July 5.48. The comet showed a coma and tail. The comet was at perihelion at 1.5 au in 2010 August and has a period of 5.7 years.

    An apparently asteroidal object of 21st magnitude was discovered by PanSTARRS on 2016 April 10.58. It was linked to earlier observations and given a minor planet designation. Further PanSTARRS images taken in early June suggested that it was likely to be a comet. After their report had been received by the MPC, the MPC received a report from Erwin Schwab on the recovery of 2010 N1 (P/WISE) and he later noted the identity with the asteroid. The indicated correction to the prediction by S. Nakano for P/2010 N1 is Delta(T) = -0.65 day. [CBET 4283, MPEC 2016-L36, 2016 June 5] The comet is at perihelion at 1.65 au in 2016 July and now has a period of 6.0 years. It made a close (0.52 au) approach to Jupiter in 2013 June, which increased the perihelion distance from 1.49 au to its current value and also slightly lengthened the period.


    338P/McNaught = 2008 J3 = 2016 N1
    Rob McNaught discovered an 18th magnitude comet on 2008 May 10.69 on CCD images taken with the 0.5-m Uppsala Schmidt telescope at Siding Spring Observatory. The comet was at perihelion at 2.29 au in mid March 2009 and has a period of 7.7 years.

    The comet was recovered at the European Space Agency Optical Ground Station with the 1.0m reflector on 2016 July 2.18. It reaches perihelion 0.8 days earlier than predicted. [CBET 4288, MPEC 2016-N12, 2016 July 3/4]


    339P/Gibbs = 2009 K1 = 2016 M2
    Alex Gibbs discovered a 19th magnitude comet on survey images taken with the Mt Lemmon 1.5-m reflector on 2009 May 16.15. The preliminary orbit gave perihelion at 1.5 au in mid June, but it had a small inclination and was likely to be periodic. Further observations confirmed the short period orbit, and both the CBAT and Hirohiso Sato computed orbits. Perihelion was at 1.3 au in late June and the period around 7.1 years.

    Hirohisa Sato recovered the comet in images taken with the 0.5m iTelescope at Siding Spring on 2016 June 29.35. It reaches perihelion 0.2 days earlier than predicted. [CBET 4287, MPEC 2016-N13, 2016 July 3/4]


    340P/Boattini = 2008 T1 = 2016 N2
    Andrea Boattini discovered an 18th magnitude comet with the Mt Lemmon 1.5-m reflector on 2008 October 1.35. Several observers confirmed the cometary nature, including Peter Birtwhistle and Rolando Ligustri Prediscovery Spacewatch images were found from September 2 and 21. The comet was at perihelion at 3.0 au in late February and has a period of 8.7 years. Brian Marsden noted that the comet made a close approach to Jupiter in 2003 April, with a minimum distance 0.03 au. Further calculations by Hirohisa Sato and others show that it approached to 0.0185 au of Jupiter on 2003 April 4. Prior to the encounter the comet had perihelion at 6.2 au and a period of 22 years.

    A 20th magnitude comet was discovered in PanSTARRS 1 images taken with the 1.8m Ritchey-Chretien on 2016 July 4.50. R Weyrk of the PanSTARRS team suggested that it might be an accidental recovery of 2008 T1 and this was confirmed by Gareth Williams. The comet reaches perihelion 0.3 days later than predicted. [CBET 4289, MPEC 2016-N27, 2016 July 5]


    341P/Gibbs = 2007 R3 = 2016 N3
    Alex Gibbs discovered a 19th magnitude comet on 2007 September 14.29 in images taken during the Catalina Sky Survey with the 0.68m Schmidt. The cometary nature was confirmed following posting on the NEOCP. The comet has a period of around 8.9 years and was at perihelion at 2.5 au in 2007 July.

    Brian Marsden noted on MPEC 2007-V52 [2007 November 6] that further [astrometric] observations of this comet were desirable.

    An 18th magnitude comet discovered during the Catalina Sky Survey with the 0.68-m Schmidt on 2016 July 15.45 was found to be the first observed return of 2007 R3. The comet reaches perihelion 0.48 days earlier than predicted.


    342P/SOHO = 2000 O3 = 2005 W4 = 2011 E1 = 2016 N5
    Jonathan Shanklin discovered another comet at 10:45 (UT) on July 31. He reported:
    I had given a lecture in the centre of Cambridge and didn't get into the office until after 10:00 (11:00 BST). First I checked the emails, including several Antarctic ones which had data that needed processing. Then I had a look at various web pages, including the latest MPECs, finally I had a look at the SOHO real time movies. I first looked at C2; there were no obvious Kreutz objects but I noted something that appeared to be moving opposite to the stars. I quickly found that it was moving consistently and emailed Doug and the group with details of the possible object. I then checked C3 in case it was visible and downloaded the real-time gif images to measure the positions. I found that it came into view at 21:30 on July 30 and was visible until 03:30 on July 31, moving horizontally from right to left just above the level of the occulting disc and below the beehive cluster. At its brightest (00:06) it was around 7th mag. I think the biggest surprise is that no-one else had picked up this object! Subsequently the comet came into view again, on images from 05:54 till after 12:00. The apparent fading around 03:30 may be due to phase effects playing a part. If it was then between us and the sun it would have zero phase and be difficult to see. The phase effect partly explains why many Kreutz comets are seen during May as this is when they are on the far side of the Sun and fully illuminated.

    The orbit was finally published on MPEC 2000-Q09 [2000 August 19], after Brian Marsden returned to the USA following the IAU meeting in Manchester. It seems that the IAU had commanded all three senior members of the CBAT to attend the meeting. The comet had been at perihelion on July 30.94 at a perihelion distance of 0.054 au. Potentially observable from the ground it is at an elongation of 50 degrees in late August, though at a magnitude of near 20. The orbit shows that it passed on the far side of the sun, so phase effects do not explain the fading.

    Further to IAUC 7472, D. Hammer has provided measurements of a comet detected by the SOHO C2 and C3 instruments and found by J. D. Shanklin via the SOHO website. The reduced measurements and orbits by B. G. Marsden, together with a search ephemeris, are given on MPEC 2000-Q09. G. J. Garradd, Loomberah, N.S.W., reports that his search for this object around Aug. 21.4 UT, out to about 0.5 deg ahead of its predicted position, yielding nothing to mag about 18. [IAUC 7479, 2000 August 21]

         2000 UT           R.A. (2000) Decl.        MPEC
         July 30.221       8 21.5      +19 08       2000-Q09
    

    A comet was discovered with the SOHO LASCO coronographs by Bo Zhou. It was a sungrazing comet of the Kracht group. (IAUC 8638, 2005 December 4)

    Brian Marsden comments on MPEC 2005-X14 [2005 December 3]

    It seems likely that the Kracht-group comet C/2005 W4 is a return of C/2000 O3 (cf. MPEC 2000-Q09), a suggestion made by S. Hoenig before the observations above were available. The orbital linkage utilizes just the C2 observations (those from July 30.89596 onward in the case of C/2000 O3); although only the first three C/2005 W4 observations were obtained with C2, the residuals of the C3 observations are not systematically displaced.
    This orbit gives the comet a period of 5.3 years and perihelion at 0.054 au.

    2011 E1 was a sungrazing comet of the Kracht group discovered by Rainer Kracht in C3 images. IAUC 9201 [2011 March 21] gives an orbit by Gareth Williams linking 2011 E1 with 2000 O3 and 2005 W4. The orbital solution requires non gravitational parameters. There is a possibility that the comet might be visible to ground based telescopes during late March and early April 2011, though it would certainly be fainter than 20th magnitude.

    A Kracht group comet discovered by Worachate Boonplod in SOHO C2 imagery from July 1 was linked to 2000 O3, 2005 W4 and 2011 E1. The comet has a period of 5.3 years and shows non-gravitational motion. [MPEC 2016-P77, 2016 August 10, CBET 4308, 2016 August 26]


    343P/NEAT-LONEOS = 2003 SQ215 = 2016 P3
    An object originally reported as stellar by NEAT and LONEOS was found to show a coma by Alan Fitzsimmons et al. The period is nearly 13 years and it reached perihelion at 2.30 au in late March 2004.

    An apparently asteroidal object reported independently by the NEAT (on September 24.18) and LONEOS (on September 27.16) projects has been found to show a nonstellar appearance in individual 30-s R-band images taken by A. Fitzsimmons and C. Snodgrass, Queen's University of Belfast, and O. Hainaut, European Southern Observatory (ESO), on 2004 Jan. 19.0 UT at the ESO 3.6-m New Technology Telescope (+ SUSI-2 camera). Fitzsimmons adds that co- addition of the frames shows an asymmetric coma of total mag 20.3 extending 1".7 in p.a. 130 deg. [IAUC 8274, 2004 January 23]

    A 20th magnitude comet was discovered in PanSTARRS 1 images taken with the 1.8m Ritchey-Chretien on August 12.48. Michael Meyer and Gareth Williams identified it with 2003 SQ215, and also found earlier PanSTARRS images from July 7, along with others taken by S. Maticic with the Crni Vrh 0.6-m f/3.3 Deltagraph on August 9. [CBET 4302, MPEC 2016-P122, 2016 August 14] The comet is returning to perihelion some 5 days earlier than previously predicted and will be at perihelion at 2.3 au in 2017 January. It has a period of 12.8 years.


    P/Read = 2005 S3 = 2016 Q1
    Michael Read discovered a 19th mag comet on Spacewatch images taken on 2005 September 30.41. Further observations suggested a period of 11 years, with the comet at perihelion in 2006 January at 2.8 au.

    Krisztian Sarneczky recovered 2005 S3 (P/Read) with the 0.6m Schmidt at Piszkesteto Station of Konkoly Observatory on August 27.04. [CBET 4310, MPEC 2016-Q52, 2016 August 30]. The comet returns to perihelion 0.5 days earlier than predicted.


    P/LINEAR = 2008 SH164 = 2016 Q3
    A 19th magnitude comet discovered during the Mt Lemmon Survey with the 1.5m reflector on August 29.35 was linked to asteroid 2008 SH164 discovered by LINEAR on 2008 September 28.23. [CBET 4312, MPEC 2016-Q54, 2016 August 30] The comet was at perihelion at 3.2 au in 2016 July and has a period of around 8.1 years.
    P/Catalina = 2007 T6 = 2016 R1   
    An apparently asteroidal object of 18th magnitude, found with the 0.68m Schmidt during the Catalina Sky Survey on 2007 October 13.47 and posted on the NEOCP was found to show a coma and faint tail on images taken by J W Young with the Table Mountain 0.61-m f/16 Cassegrain reflector. The comet was at perihelion at 2.2 au in 2007 August and has a period of around 9.5 years. The comet has also been identified with asteroid 2007 TU149 by S Nakano.

    The comet was recovered by Krisztian Sarneczky and P Szekely with the 0.6m Schmidt at Piszkesteto Station of Konkoly Observatory on September 1.08.  It was not given a designation on the MPEC. It returns to perihelion 0.35 days earlier than predicted. [MPEC 2016-R19, 2016 September 2, CBET 4315, 2016 September 3 ]


    P/PanSTARRS = 2009 Q9 = 2016 SV
    A 19th magnitude comet was discovered in PanSTARRS 1 images taken with the 1.8m Ritchey-Chretien on September 21.47, with pre-discovery images from June 20 and September 19 that were identified later. Gareth Williams then identified the comet in images from the Catalina Sky Survey from 2009 August and October. [CBET 4323, MPEC 2016-S61, 2016 September 27] The comet was at perihelion at 2.2 au in 2016 September and has a period of 6.8 years.

    Published by Jonathan Shanklin. Jon Shanklin - jds@ast.cam.ac.uk