BAA Comet Section : Comets discovered in 2014

Updated 2014 July 30


  • 2014 A1 (296P/Garradd)
  • 2014 A2 (P/Hill)
  • 2014 A3 (P/PanSTARRS)
  • 2014 A4 (SONEAR)
  • 2014 A5 (PanSTARRS)
  • 2014 AA52 (Catalina)
  • 2014 B1 (Schwartz)
  • 2014 C1 (P/TOTAS)
  • 2014 C2 (STEREO)
  • 2014 C3 (NEOWISE)
  • 2014 C4 (298P/Christensen)
  • A/2014 CW14 [Mt Lemmon]
  • 2014 D1 (297P/Beshore)
  • 2014 D2 (299P/Catalina-PanSTARRS)
  • A/2014 DD10 [Mt Lemmon]
  • A/2014 DB11 [La Sagra]
  • 2014 E1 (P/Larson)
  • 2014 E2 (Jacques)
  • 2014 F1 (Hill)
  • 2014 F2 (Tenagra)
  • 2014 F3 (Sheppard-Trujillo)
  • 2014 G1 (PanSTARRS)
  • 2014 G2 (300P/Catalina)
  • 2014 G3 (PanSTARRS)
  • 2014 H1 (Christensen)
  • 2014 J1 (Catalina)
  • 2014 K1 (301P/LINEAR-NEAT)
  • 2014 K2 (302P/Lemmon-PanSTARRS)
  • 2014 K3 (P/SOHO)
  • A/2014 KG2 [NEOWISE]
  • 2014 L1 (303P/NEAT)
  • 2014 L2 (P/NEOWISE)
  • 2014 L3 (P/Hill)
  • 2014 L4 (304P/Ory)
  • 2014 L5 (Lemmon)
  • 2014 M1 (PanSTARRS)
  • 2014 M2 (Christensen)
  • 2014 M3 (Catalina)
  • 2014 M4 (PanSTARRS)
  • 2014 M5 (P/LINEAR)
  • 2014 MG4 (P/Spacewatch-PanSTARRS)
  • 2014 N1 (305P/Skiff)
  • 2014 N2 (PanSTARRS)
  • 2014 N3 (NEOWISE)
  • 2014 O1 (P/LINEAR)
  • 2014 O2 (P/Lagerkvist-Carsenty)

  • When observing a comet please try to forget how bright you think the comet should be, what it was when you last viewed it, what other observers think it is or what the ephemeris says it should be.

    The equations for the light curves of comets that are currently visible use only the raw observations and should give a reasonable prediction for the current brightness. If the comet has not yet been observed or has gone from view a correction for aperture is included, so that telescopic observers should expect the comet to be fainter than given by the equation. The correction is about 0.033 per centimetre. Values for the r parameter given in square brackets [ ] are assumed. The form of the light curve is either the standard m = H0 + 5 log d + K0 log r or the linear brightening m = H0 + 5 log d + L0 abs(t - T + D0) where T is the date of perihelion, t the present and D0 an offset, if L0 is +ve the comet brightens towards perihelion and if D0 is +ve the comet is brightest prior to perihelion.

    Observations of new comets in 2014 are given in ICQ format. 

    Full details of recently discovered objects will not appear until they are available on the CBAT web pages. The actual accuracy of preliminary orbits is often (nearly always) much worse than the published accuracy implies.  In part this is because each orbital solution is treated as a mathematical construct and does not take account of observational error.  JPL does publish the errors, whereas the MPECs do not.


    SOHO comets
    A SOHO C2 comet discovered by Zhijian Xu on May 17 may be linked with 2008 Y12, with previous (unobserved) returns on 1998 February 16 and 2003 July 23.
    2014 A1 (296P/Garradd)
    2007 H3 (P/Garradd) was recovered by an observing team at the Pierre Auger Observatory, Malargue using the 0.3m f/10 reflector on January 6.31.  Following recovery prediscovery NEAT images from 2001 June were identified. The comet was close to the predicted time of return.
    2014 A2 (P/Hill)
    Rik Hill, a BAA Member, discovered a 19th magnitude comet during the Catalina Sky Survey with the 0.68m Schmidt on January 9.43. Prediscovery images from 2013 November were found in Mt Lemmon Survey data. [MPEC 2014-B01, 2014 January 16] The comet was at perihelion at 2.1 au in 2013 October and has a period of around 14 years.  This was Rik's 25th comet discovery and puts him at 5th on the all-time list of personal comet discoverers.
    2014 A3 (P/PanSTARRS)
    A 21st magnitude comet was discovered in PanSTARRS 1 images taken with the 1.8m Ritchey-Chretien on January 9.51. [MPEC 2014-B02, 2014 January 16] The comet was at perihelion at 3.6 au in 2013 April and has a period of around 10 years.
    2014 A4 (SONEAR)
    An 18th magnitude object was discovered by Cristovao Jacques, Eduardo Pimentel and Joao Ribeiro de Barros with the 0.46m telescope (the MPEC says 0.3m) at the Southern Observatory for Near Earth Research at Oliveira, Brazil on January 12.03. It was noted as cometary by other astrometrists. [MPEC 2014-B03, 2014 January 16] The comet has perihelion at 4.2 au in 2015 September.  

    Cristovao Jacques provides the following discovery information: 
    The Southern Observatory for Near Earth Asteroids Research (SONEAR) is located in Oliveira, a city 120 km from Belo Horizonte, that is the third largest in Brazil. The sky is pretty good, although we have a 1200mm annual rainfall. We began our operations in 2013 July with a 12" Schmidt Cassegrain, got the Y00 code and in late October our main instrument was ready to begin operation and adjustments. Now we use a 18" f/2.9 telescope reflector completely made in Brazil. The mount is a Paramount MEII with  a FLI microline 16803 CCD. This system yields a 1.64 x 1.64 degree field, plate scale of 1.44 "/pixel, with 8 seconds downloads.

    Our observatory is a Roll Off 6 x 4 meters. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LVJPlM8TG5E  and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V0RSOJNfVN8  You can see a picture of our telescope at: http://www.observatorio- phoenix.org/t_proj/Sonear/ sonear.htm . I am still not satisfied with the telescope performance because we are struggling with collimation and other small issues. 

    For detection, we use Paulo Holvorcemīs software called Skysift. We are now tuning the parameters, so we can better detect objects. If someone is interested in this software you can contact him at holvorcem@.... For planning the night we use other Holvorcemīs software called TAO . http://sites.mpc.com.br/holvorcem/tao/readme.html . For telescope and CCD control we use ACP and Maxim. 

    December and January are the rainy season months in Brazil, but this year has been atypical, so we had 12 clear nights in a row.  2014 A4 was discovered on the night of January 12th, as we were surveying the region between R.A 5 and 6 hours, and declination -40 and -50. As the beginning of the survey was centralized in dec -40, half of the field was above this declination, so we spotted the object in declination -39.6 in a matter of luck.  Since December 18th, we have been sending a Sky Coverage  report to MPC. http://www.minorplanetcenter.net/iau/SkyCoverage.html 

    I analysed the images 12 hours after the end of the night. The object was apparently asteroidal. On the next day, Ernesto Guido emailed me saying that he imaged the object in Australia and it was a little bit elongated. One day more, he confirmed the comet nature using Faulkes South. 


    2014 A5 (PanSTARRS)
    A 21st magnitude comet was discovered in PanSTARRS 1 images taken with the 1.8m Ritchey-Chretien on January 4.41. It was not confirmed until observations were made with the 3.6m Canada-France-Hawaii telescope on January 26. [MPEC 2014-B54, 2014 January 27] The comet is at perihelion at 4.8 au in 2014 August.
    2014 AA52 (Catalina)
    A 20th magnitude asteroid was discovered by the Catalina Sky Survey on January 11.39. [MPEC 2014-A87, 2014 January 15] The object had a retrograde orbit with a period of around 50 years and perihelion at 1.8 au in 2015 March.  It was classed as a Centaur.

    On February 26 it was reclassified as a comet following the detection of cometary activity. The latest orbit is hyperbolic with perihelion at 2.0 au in 2015 February.


    2014 B1 (Schwartz)
    Michael Schwartz discovered a 20th magnitude comet in images taken with the Tenagra II 0.41-m f3.75 astrograph on January 28.10. [MPEC 2014-C03, 2014 February 1] The comet is at perihelion at 9.6 in 2017 September.
    2014 C1 (P/TOTAS)
    The Teide Observatory Tenerife Asteroid Survey discovered a 19th magnitude comet with the 1.0m f4.4 reflector on February 1.24. [MPEC 2014-C10, 2014 February 4] The comet was at perihelion at 1.7 au in 2013 December and has a period of around 5.4 years.
    2014 C2 (STEREO)
    Alan Watson reported a fast moving object in MPEC 2014-C25 reported an orbit for the object on February 8. The comet was at perihelion at 0.5 au on February 18. Man-To Hui notes that the comet was at nearly 180° phase angle from the perspective of the spacecraft at discovery and would have shown strong forward scattering.  Hidetaka Sato was able to image the comet from the ground with the iTelescope at New Mexico on February 19, when he estimated it at 15.6, not far from the ephemeris position.
    2014 C3 (NEOWISE)
    An 18th magnitude comet was discovered by the WISE spacecraft on February 14.71 in its new guise of NEOWISE. [MPEC 2014-D11, 2014 February 20] Hirohisa Sato computed an improved a retrograde orbit.  The latest orbit is retrograde, with perihelion at 1.9 au in 2014 January and has a period of over 1000 years.
    2014 C4 (298P/Christensen)
    Jim Scotti recovered 2007 C1 (P/Christensen) in images taken with the 1.8m Spacewatch II reflector on February 9.54. The comet returned to perihelion 0.52 days earlier than predicted.
    A/2014 CW14 (Mt Lemmon)
    A 21st magnitude asteroid was discovered by the Mt Lemmon Survey on February 10.29. [MPEC 2014-D08, 2014 February 19] The object has a retrograde orbit with a period of around 90 years and will reach perihelion at 4.2 au in 2014 December.  It is classed as a Centaur. Aphelion is at around 35 au. The Tisserand parameter of the orbit with respect to Jupiter is -2.12 and it approaches to within 0.5 au of the planet.
    2014 D1 (297P/Beshore)
    The comet was recovered at the Cordell-Lorenz Observatory with their 0.3m Schmidt-Cassegrain on February 27.40, with pre-recovery images then found in Mt Lemmon data from January 2. The comet returns to perihelion 0.3 days earlier than predicted.
    2014 D2 (299P/Catalina-PanSTARRS)
    An 18th magnitude comet was discovered by the Catalina Sky Survey in images taken on February 27.31 and by PanSTARRS in images taken on February 27.43. The comet appeared about a magnitude fainter in the PanSTARRS images. Pre-discovery images were found in PanSTARRS data from 2013 January, December, 2014 January and February. [MPEC 2014-E50, 2014 March 9]. The comet has a period of 9.1 years with perihelion at 3.1 au in 2015 February.

    When the orbit improved the comet was linked to asteroid 2005 EL284 observed by LONEOS and LINEAR in 2005 March and by the Siding Spring Survey in 2005 July.
    A/2014 DD10 (Mt Lemmon)
    A 21st magnitude asteroid was discovered by the Mt Lemmon Survey on February 20.47. [MPEC 2014-D32, 2014 February 24] The object has an orbit with a period of around 8 years and was at perihelion at 0.5 au in 2013 November.  It is classed as an Apollo. The Tisserand parameter of the orbit with respect to Jupiter is 2.12 and it approaches to within 0.2 au of the planet. It approached Venus to about 0.1 au in 2013 October.
    A/2014 DB11 (La Sagra)
    A 19th magnitude asteroid was discovered by the La Sagra team on February 22.99. [MPEC 2014-D40, 2014 February 24] The object has an orbit with a period of around 5 years and will be at perihelion at 1.2 au in 2014 March.  It is classed as an Amor. The Tisserand parameter of the orbit with respect to Jupiter is 2.93 and it approaches to within 0.4 au of the planet.
    2014 E1 (P/Larson)
    Steve Larson discovered a 17th magnitude comet during the Catalina Sky Survey with the 0.68m Schmidt on March 10.45. Prediscovery images from 2014 January were found in CSS data. [MPEC 2014-E78, 2014 March 12] The comet is at perihelion at 2.1 au in 2014 May and has a period of around 7.1 years. 
    2014 E2 (Jacques)
    Cristovao Jacques discovered a 15th magnitude comet on March 13.06 using the 0.45m telescope at the Southern Observatory for Near Earth Research at Oliveira, Brazil. [MPEC 2014-E84, 2014 March 14] The comet will reach perihelion at 0.7 au in July. Some observations suggested that it was already 11th magnitude just after discovery, and it has continued to brighten fairly quickly. UK observers may pick up the fading comet again in July and if we are lucky it may still be 4th magnitude albeit in the morning sky.

    62 observations received so far suggest a preliminary aperture corrected light curve of m = 5.3 + 5 log d + 17.0 log r .  This suggests a possible peak magnitude of around 3. though it is then close to the Sun in the sky.


    2014 F1 (Hill)
    Rik Hill, a BAA Member, discovered a 19th magnitude comet during the Catalina Sky Survey with the 0.68m Schmidt on March 29.47. [MPEC 2014-G02, 2014 April 1] The comet was at perihelion at 3.5 au in 2013 October.
    2014 F2 (Tenagra)
    An asteroidal object discovered at the Tenagra II Observatory by Michael Schwartz and Paulo Holvorcem with the 0.41m astrograph on March 31.35 was found to show cometary features after posting on the NEOCP. [MPEC 2014-G12, 2014 April 3]. The comet has an orbit with perihelion at 4.3 au in 2015 January and a period of around 2000 years.
    2014 F3 (Sheppard-Trujillo)
    Follow up observations by S S Sheppard on May 22/23 of a 23rd magnitude object discovered by Sheppard and C Trujillo on March 26.33 with the 4.0-m CTIO reflector at Cerro Tololo showed cometary features. [MPEC 2014-K30, 2014 May 23]. The comet has an orbit with a period of around 60 years and perihelion at 5.6 au in 2021.
    2014 G1 (PanSTARRS)
    A 20th magnitude comet was discovered in PanSTARRS 1 images taken with the 1.8m Ritchey-Chretien on April 5.57. [MPEC 2014-G42, 2014 April 7] The comet was at perihelion at 5.5 au in 2013 December.  This was PanSTARRS 50th comet.
    2014 G2 (300P/Catalina)
    2005 JQ5 (P/Catalina) was recovered by M. Masek, J. Cerny, J. Ebr, M. Prouza, P. Kubanek, M. Jelinek, K. Honkova and J. Jurysek at the Pierre Auger Observatory, Malarque with the 0.3m reflector on April 9.39. [MPEC 2014-G70, 2014 April 10]. The comet returns to perihelion 0.1 days earlier than predicted.

    The comet can make close approaches to Venus, Earth and Mars. Its last close approach to Earth was at the discovery apparition in 2005, when it came to 0.10 au and in 2036 it will approach to 0.06 au. It will approach within 0.08 au of Mars in 2132 and approached Venus to 0.09 au in 1957.


    2014 G3 (PanSTARRS)
    A 20th magnitude comet was discovered in PanSTARRS 1 images taken with the 1.8m Ritchey-Chretien on April 10.54. [MPEC 2014-H04, 2014 April 17] The comet is at perihelion at 4.7 au in 2015 February.
    2014 H1 (Christensen)
    Eric Christensen discovered an 18th magnitude comet on April 24.42 on images taken during the Mt Lemmon Survey with the 1.5m reflector. [MPEC 2014-H33, 2014 April 25].  The comet was near perihelion at 2.1 au.  An improved orbit by Hirohisa Sato suggests that the orbit is a long period ellipse.
    2014 J1 (Catalina)
    An 18th magnitude object was discovered by the Catalina Sky Survey on May 9.36. [MPEC 2014-K03, 2014 May 16] The object was found to show cometary features by other observers. It has a retrograde orbit and perihelion at 1.7 au in 2014 June. It is intrinsically faint.
    2014 K1 (301P/LINEAR-NEAT)
    2001 BB50 (P/LINEAR-NEAT) was recovered in images from PanSTARRS taken on May 17.28, with earlier images taken at the SATINO remote observatory, Haute Province on March 1.93. The comet will return to perihelion 1.76 days earlier than predicted and has a period of 13.7 years.
    2014 K2 (302P/Lemmon-PanSTARRS)
    A 21st magnitude comet discovered in PanSTARRS 1 images taken with the 1.8m Ritchey-Chretien on April 29.36, was linked to asteroid 2007 RJ236 discovered during the Mt Lemmon survey on 2007 September 13.30. It was also linked to observations made by the Purple Mountain Observatory in 2007 August. [MPEC 2014-K28, 2014 May 23] The comet is at perihelion at 3.3 au in 2016 April and has a period of 8.86 years.
    2014 K3 (P/SOHO)
    A non-group SOHO comet discovered in C2 images by Zhijian Xu on May 17 was quickly linked to 2008 Y12 by Michal Kusiak and the orbit confirmed by Reiner Kracht. A linked orbit by Gareth Williams was published on MPEC 2014-K37 on May 24. The comet has a period of 5.4 years and perihelion 0.07 au.
    A/2014 KG2 [NEOWISE]
    A 19th magnitude asteroid was discovered by the NEOWISE spacecraft on May 18.54 [MPEC 2014-K22, 2014 May 21] It is classed as a Centaur, with a period of around 16 years and near perihelion at 1.4 au. The error bars on the orbital parameters are very large. The Tisserand parameter of the orbit with respect to Jupiter is 2.08.
    A/2014 KL4 [PanSTARRS]
    A 21st magnitude asteroid was discovered by PanSTARRS on May 17.26 [MPEC 2014-K33, 2014 May 23] It is classed as a Centaur, with a period of around 50 years and not far past perihelion at 1.9 au. The error bars on the orbital parameters are very large. The Tisserand parameter of the orbit with respect to Jupiter is 1.98.
    2014 L1 (303P/NEAT)
    2003 U3 (P/NEAT) was recovered in images taken at the ESA Optical Ground Station in Tenerife with the 1.0m reflector by P Ruiz. The comet will return to perihelion 1.80 days earlier than predicted and has a period of 11.4 years.  [MPEC 2014-L12, 2014 June 2]
    2014 L2 (P/NEOWISE)
    Rachel Stevenson reported a probable comet in NEOWISE spacecraft images from June 7.41. Follow-up ground-based observations confirmed the comet at 16th magnitude. [MPEC 2014-L61 CBET 3901, 2014 June 15] The comet is at perihelion at 2.2 au in 2014 July and has a period of around 16 years.
    2014 L3 (P/Hill)
    Rik Hill discovered an 18th magnitude comet during the Catalina Sky Survey with the 0.68m Schmidt on June 10.36. Prediscovery images from June 2 were also found in Catalina data. [MPEC 2014-L62, 2014 June 15] The comet was near perihelion at 1.9 au and has a period of around 25 years. 
    2014 L4 (304P/Ory)
    2008 Q2 (P/Ory) was recovered by Hidetaka Sato in images taken with the iTelescope 0.51m astrograph at Siding Spring on June 2.79. The comet is very close to the prediction by B. G. Marsden on MPC 65935. It has a period of 5.8 years.  [MPEC 2014-M10, CBET 3906, 2014 June 18]
    2014 L5 (Lemmon)
    A 20th magnitude comet was discovered during the Mt Lemmon survey with the 1.5m reflector on June 9.44 and confirmed after a period of time on the NEOCP and PCCP. [MPEC 2014-M57, 2014 June 28] It has perihelion at 6.2 au in December.
    2014 M1 (PanSTARRS)
    A 21st magnitude comet was discovered in PanSTARRS 1 images taken with the 1.8m Ritchey-Chretien on June 24.49. [CBET 3915, MPEC 2014-N01, 2014 July 1] The comet will reach perihelion at 5.6 au in 2015 August.
    2014 M2 (Christensen)
    Eric Christensen discovered a 20th magnitude comet on June 25.31 on images taken during the Mt Lemmon Survey with the 1.5m reflector. [CBET 3916, MPEC 2014-N02, 2014 July 1].  The comet was at perihelion at 8.3 au in 2013 January. 
    2014 M3 (Catalina)
    A 19th magnitude object was discovered by the Catalina Sky Survey on June 26.40. [CBET 3917, MPEC 2014-N03, 2014 July 1] The object was found to show cometary features by other observers. It has a retrograde orbit and perihelion at 2.4 au in 2014 June. It is intrinsically faint.
    2014 M4 (P/PanSTARRS)
    R Wainscoat discovered a 21st magnitude comet in PanSTARRS 1 images taken with the 1.8m Ritchey-Chretien on June 30.57. [CBET 3920, MPEC 2014-N45, 2014 July 7] The comet will reach perihelion at 2.3 au in 2015 January and has a period of around 6.3 years.
    2014 M5 (P/LINEAR)
    2003 O3 (P/LINEAR) was recovered by Hidetaka Sato in images taken with the iTelescope 0.51m astrograph at Siding Spring on June 21.77. The comet was missed at its 2009 return and is close to the prediction in the 2014 ICQ Handbook. It has a period of 5.5 years with perihelion at 1.3 au.  [MPEC 2014-N76, CBET 3922, 2014 July 14]
    2014 MG4 (P/Spacewatch-PanSTARRS)
    Spacewatch discovered an asteroidal object with the 0.9m reflector at Kitt Peak on June 20.42. PanSTARRS observers then discovered a 19th magnitude comet in images taken with the 1.8m Ritchey-Chretien on July 25.46 that was found to be the same object. [CBET 3924, MPEC 2014-O48, 2014 July 28] The comet was at perihelion at 3.8 au in 2013 June and has a period of around 11 years.
    2014 N1 (305P/Skiff)
    Gareth Williams found images of 2004 V1 (P/Skiff) in images taken taken with the PanSTARRS 1 1.8m Ritchey-Chretien on July 3.51. The comet will return to perihelion 0.32 days earlier than predicted and has a period of 9.9 years.  [CBET 3918, MPEC 2014-N43, 2014 July 7]
    2014 N2 (PanSTARRS)
    A 20th magnitude comet was discovered in PanSTARRS 1 images taken with the 1.8m Ritchey-Chretien on July 2.55. [CBET 3919, MPEC 2014-N44, 2014 July 7] The comet will reach perihelion at 2.2 au in 2014 August.
    2014 N3 (NEOWISE)
    An 18th magnitude comet was discovered by the NEOWISE (formerly WISE) spacecraft on July 4.52. [CBET 3921, MPEC 2014-N71, 2014 July 13] .  The comet has perihelion at 3.8 au in 2015 March.
    2014 O1 (P/LINEAR)
    A team of observers at the European Space Agency's Optical Ground Station recovered 2000 QJ46 (P/LINEAR) with the 1.0m reflector on July 25.15. The indicated correction to the prediction by B. G. Marsden on MPC 75735 is Delta(T) = -0.24 day.  [CBET 3923, MPEC 2014-O44, 2014 July 27] The comet has a period of 14 years and reaches perihelion at 1.9 au in December.
    2014 O2 (P/Lagerqvist-Carsenty)
    A team of observers at the European Space Agency's Optical Ground Station recovered 1997 T3 (P/Lagerqvist-Carsenty) with the 1.0m reflector on July 29.08. The indicated correction to the prediction by B. G. Marsden on MPC 79348 is Delta(T) = -1.28 days. [CBET 3925, MPEC 2014-O65, 2014 July 30] The comet has a period of 17 years and reaches perihelion at 4.2 au in 2015 May.
    Ephemerides of current comets are available on the CBAT ephemeris page and positions of newly discovered comets are on the NEO confirmation page.
    More information on LINEAR. A list of comets discovered by selected search programs.
    The Northumberland refractor is the telescope that was used in the search for Neptune. It now has a 0.30-m f20 doublet lens which gives a stellar limiting magnitude of around 15 at the zenith on good nights. The Thorrowgood refractor was built in 1864 and has a 0.20-m f14 doublet lens.
    Published by Jonathan Shanklin. Jon Shanklin - jds@ast.cam.ac.uk