BAA Comet Section : Comets discovered in 2007

Updated 2014 October 19


  • A/2001 SS287
  • 2004 A4 (SOHO)
  • 2004 B11 (SOHO)
  • 2004 E5 (SOHO)
  • 2004 J20 (SOHO)
  • 2005 B5 (SOHO)
  • 2005 B6 (SOHO)
  • 2006 A8 (SOHO)
  • 2007 A1 (184P/Lovas)
  • 2007 A2 (P/Christensen)
  • 2007 A3 (185P/Petriew)
  • 2007 A4 (SOHO)
  • 2007 A5 (SOHO)
  • 2007 A6 (SOHO)
  • 2007 A7 (SOHO)
  • 2007 B1 (P/Christensen)
  • 2007 B2 (Skiff)
  • 2007 B3 (186P/Garradd)
  • 2007 B4 (SOHO)
  • 2007 B5 (SOHO)
  • 2007 B6 (SOHO)
  • 2007 C1 (P/Christensen)
  • 2007 C2 (P/Catalina)
  • 2007 C3 (SOHO)
  • 2007 C4 (SOHO)
  • 2007 C5 (SOHO)
  • 2007 C6 (SOHO)
  • 2007 C7 (SOHO)
  • 2007 C8 (SOHO)
  • 2007 C9 (SOHO)
  • 2007 C10 (SOHO)
  • 2007 C11 (SOHO)
  • 2007 C12 (SOHO)
  • 2007 C13 (SOHO)
  • 2007 D1 (LINEAR)
  • 2007 D2 (Spacewatch)
  • 2007 D3 (LINEAR)
  • 2007 D4 (SOHO)
  • 2007 D5 (SOHO)
  • A/2007 DN41 [Mt Lemmon]
  • A/2007 DA61 [Mt Lemmon]
  • A/2007 DU112 [Spacewatch]
  • 2007 E1 (Garradd)
  • 2007 E2 (Lovejoy)
  • 2007 E3 (187P/LINEAR)
  • 2007 E4 (SOHO)
  • 2007 E5 (SOHO)
  • A/2007 EJ [Mt Lemmon]
  • A/2007 EP88 [Siding Spring]
  • 2007 F1 (LONEOS)
  • 2007 F2 (SOHO)
  • 2007 F3 (SOHO)
  • 2007 F4 (SOHO)
  • 2007 F5 (SOHO)
  • A/2007 FD1 [Steward]
  • A/2007 FL1 [Catalina]
  • 2007 G1 (LINEAR)
  • 2007 G2 (SOHO)
  • 2007 H1 (P/McNaught)
  • 2007 H2 (Skiff)
  • 2007 H3 (P/Garradd)
  • 2007 H4 (SOHO)
  • 2007 H5 (SOHO)
  • 2007 H6 (SOHO)
  • 2007 H7 (SOHO)
  • 2007 H8 (SOHO)
  • 2007 H9 (SOHO)
  • 2007 J1 (SOHO)
  • 2007 J2 (SOHO)
  • 2007 J3 (SOHO)
  • 2007 J4 (SOHO)
  • 2007 J5 (SOHO)
  • 2007 J6 (SOHO)
  • 2007 J7 (188P/LINEAR-Mueller)
  • 2007 J8 (SOHO)
  • 2007 J9 (SOHO)
  • 2007 J10 (SOHO)
  • 2007 J11 (SOHO)
  • 2007 J12 (SOHO)
  • 2007 JA21 (LINEAR)
  • 2007 K1 (Lemmon)
  • 2007 K2 (P/Gibbs)
  • 2007 K3 (Siding Spring)
  • 2007 K4 (Gibbs)
  • 2007 K5 (Lovejoy)
  • 2007 K6 (McNaught)
  • 2007 K7 (SOHO)
  • 2007 K8 (SOHO)
  • 2007 K9 (SOHO)
  • 2007 K10 (SOHO)
  • 2007 K11 (SOHO)
  • 2007 K12 (SOHO)
  • 2007 K13 (SOHO)
  • 2007 K14 (SOHO)
  • 2007 K15 (SOHO)
  • 2007 K16 (SOHO)
  • 2007 K17 (SOHO)
  • 2007 K18 (SOHO)
  • 2007 K19 (SOHO)
  • 2007 K20 (SOHO)
  • 2007 K21 (SOHO)
  • 2007 L1 (SOHO)
  • 2007 L2 (SOHO)
  • 2007 L3 (SOHO)
  • 2007 L4 (SOHO)
  • 2007 L5 (SOHO)
  • 2007 L6 (SOHO)
  • 2007 L7 (SOHO)
  • 2007 L8 (SOHO)
  • 2007 L9 (SOHO)
  • 2007 L10 (SOHO)
  • 2007 L11 (SOHO)
  • 2007 L12 (SOHO)
  • 2007 L13 (SOHO)
  • 2007 M1 (McNaught)
  • 2007 M2 (Catalina)
  • 2007 M3 (LINEAR)
  • 2007 M4 (SOHO)
  • 2007 M5 (SOHO)
  • 2007 M6 (SOHO)
  • 2007 M7 (SOHO)
  • 2007 M8 (SOHO)
  • 2007 M9 (SOHO)
  • 2007 M10 (SOHO)
  • 2007 N1 (191P/McNaught)
  • 2007 N2 (189P/NEAT)
  • 2007 N3 (Lulin)
  • 2007 N4 (SOHO)
  • 2007 N5 (SOHO)
  • 2007 N6 (SOHO)
  • 2007 N7 (SOHO)
  • 2007 N8 (SOHO)
  • 2007 O1 (LINEAR)
  • 2007 O2 (190P/Mueller)
  • 2007 O3 (SOHO)
  • 2007 O4 (SOHO)
  • 2007 P1 (McNaught)
  • A/2007 PA8 [LINEAR]
  • 2007 Q1 (Garradd)
  • 2007 Q2 (P/Gilmore)
  • 2007 Q3 (Siding Spring)
  • 2007 Q4 (SOHO)
  • 2007 Q5 (SOHO)
  • 2007 Q6 (SOHO)
  • 2007 Q7 (SOHO)
  • 2007 Q8 (SOHO)
  • 2007 Q9 (SOHO)
  • 2007 R1 (P/Larson)
  • 2007 R2 (P/Gibbs)
  • 2007 R3 (P/Gibbs)
  • 2007 R4 (P/Garradd)
  • 2007 R5 (P/SOHO)
  • 2007 R6 (SOHO)
  • 2007 R7 (SOHO)
  • 2007 R8 (SOHO)
  • 2007 R9 (SOHO)
  • 2007 R10 (SOHO)
  • A/2007 RV19 [LINEAR]
  • 2007 S1 (P/Zhao)
  • 2007 S2 (Lemmon)
  • 2007 S3 (SOHO)
  • 2007 S4 (SOHO)
  • 2007 S5 (SOHO)
  • 2007 S6 (SOHO)
  • 2007 S7 (SOHO)
  • 2007 S8 (SOHO)
  • 2007 S9 (SOHO)
  • 2007 S10 (SOHO)
  • 2007 S11 (SOHO)
  • 2007 T1 (McNaught)
  • 2007 T2 (P/Kowalski)
  • 2007 T3 (192P/Shoemaker-Levy)
  • 2007 T4 (P/Gibbs)
  • 2007 T5 (Gibbs)
  • 2007 T6 (P/Catalina)
  • 2007 T7 (SOHO)
  • 2007 T8 (SOHO)
  • 2007 T9 (SOHO)
  • 2007 T10 (SOHO)
  • 2007 T11 (SOHO)
  • 2007 T12 (SOHO)
  • 2007 T13 (SOHO)
  • 2007 T14 (SOHO)
  • 2007 U1 (LINEAR)
  • 2007 U2 (193P/LINEAR-NEAT)
  • 2007 U3 (SOHO)
  • 2007 U4 (SOHO)
  • 2007 U5 (SOHO)
  • 2007 U6 (SOHO)
  • 2007 U7 (SOHO)
  • 2007 U8 (SOHO)
  • 2007 U9 (SOHO)
  • 2007 U10 (SOHO)
  • 2007 U11 (SOHO)
  • 2007 U12 (SOHO)
  • 2007 U13 (SOHO)
  • 2007 V1 (P/Larson)
  • 2007 V2 (P/Hill)
  • 2007 V3 (SOHO)
  • 2007 V4 (SOHO)
  • 2007 V5 (SOHO)
  • 2007 V6 (SOHO)
  • 2007 V7 (SOHO)
  • 2007 V8 (SOHO)
  • 2007 V9 (SOHO)
  • 2007 V10 (SOHO)
  • 2007 V11 (SOHO)
  • 2007 V12 (SOHO)
  • 2007 V13 (SOHO)
  • 2007 V14 (SOHO)
  • 2007 VQ11 (P/Catalina)
  • 2007 VO53 (Spacewatch)
  • A/2007 VJ8 [Mt Lemmon]
  • A/2007 VA85 [LINEAR]
  • A/2007 VA188 [LINEAR]
  • A/2007 VE189 [Mt Lemmon]
  • A/2007 VW266 [Mt Lemmon]
  • 2007 W1 (Boattini)
  • 2007 W2 (194P/LINEAR)
  • 2007 W3 (LINEAR)
  • 2007 W4 (SOHO)
  • 2007 W5 (SOHO)
  • 2007 W6 (SOHO)
  • 2007 W7 (SOHO)
  • 2007 W8 (SOHO)
  • 2007 W9 (SOHO)
  • 2007 W10 (SOHO)
  • 2007 W11 (SOHO)
  • 2007 W12 (SOHO)
  • A/2007 WW3 [Mt Lemmon]
  • 2007 X1 (SOHO)
  • 2007 X2 (SOHO)
  • 2007 X3 (SOHO)
  • 2007 X4 (SOHO)
  • 2007 X5 (SOHO)
  • 2007 X6 (SOHO)
  • 2007 X7 (SOHO)
  • 2007 X8 (SOHO)
  • 2007 X9 (SOHO)
  • 2007 X10 (SOHO)
  • 2007 X11 (SOHO)
  • 2007 X12 (SOHO)
  • 2007 X13 (SOHO)
  • 2007 X14 (SOHO)
  • 2007 X15 (SOHO)
  • A/2007 XJ16 [Steward]
  • 2007 Y1 (LINEAR)
  • 2007 Y2 (McNaught)
  • 2007 Y3 (SOHO)
  • 2007 Y4 (SOHO)
  • 2007 Y5 (SOHO)
  • 2007 Y6 (SOHO)
  • 2007 Y7 (SOHO)
  • 2007 Y8 (SOHO)
  • 2007 Y9 (SOHO)
  • 2007 Y10 (SOHO)

  • When observing a comet please try to forget how bright you think the comet should be, what it was when you last viewed it, what other observers think it is or what the ephemeris says it should be.

    The equations for the light curves of comets that are currently visible use only the raw observations and should give a reasonable prediction for the current brightness. If the comet has not yet been observed or has gone from view a correction for aperture is included, so that telescopic observers should expect the comet to be fainter than given by the equation. The correction is about 0.033 per centimetre. Values for the r parameter given in square brackets [ ] are assumed. The form of the light curve is either the standard m = H0 + 5 log d + K0 log r or the linear brightening m = H0 + 5 log d + L0 abs(t - T + D0) where T is the date of perihelion, t the present and D0 an offset, if L0 is +ve the comet brightens towards perihelion and if D0 is +ve the comet is brightest prior to perihelion.

    Observations of new comets are given in ICQ format. More recent ones may be available in TA format from the main page.

    Full details of recently discovered objects will not appear until they are available on the CBAT web pages, which is usually a fortnight after the publication of the IAUC.


    Meyer Group SOHO comets
    2007 A6 (SOHO)(IAUC)
    2007 C10 (SOHO)(IAUC)
    2007 F4 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 J1 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 K12 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 R10 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 U7 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 V10 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 X7 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 X14 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 Y8 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    were discovered with the SOHO LASCO coronographs and have not been observed elsewhere. They were sungrazing comets of the Meyer group. For further information on the discovery of these objects see this year's SOHO discoveries.
    Kracht Group SOHO comets
    2004 J20 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    was discovered with the SOHO LASCO coronographs and has not been observed elsewhere. It was a sungrazing comet of the Kracht group.

    For further information on the discovery of these objects see this year's SOHO discoveries.


    Marsden Group SOHO comets
    2007 Y4 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    was discovered with the SOHO LASCO coronographs and has not been observed elsewhere. It was a sungrazing comet of the Marsden group. Brian Marsden has linked it with C/2002 R4:
    K. Battams has suggested the identity of the Marsden-group comet C/2007 Y4 with C/2002 R4 (cf. MPEC 2002-S35). The following linkage (all the observations having been made with the C2 coronagraph), by Marsden, yields for the previous perihelion passage T = 1997 May 15.2 and an approach within 0.063 AU of the earth on 1997 June 14.7. [MPEC 2008-B49, 2008 January 25]

    Karl Battams has put together a probable family tree for the fragments.

    For further information on the discovery of this object see this year's SOHO discoveries.


    SOHO Kreutz group comets
    2004 A4 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2004 B11 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2004 E5 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2005 B5 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2005 B6 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2006 A8 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 A4 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 A5 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 B4 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 B5 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 B6 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 C3 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 C4 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 C5 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 C6 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 C8 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 C9 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 C11 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 C13 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 D4 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 D5 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 E4 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 E5 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 F2 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 F3 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 F5 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 G2 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 H4 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 H5 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 H6 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 H7 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 H8 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 H9 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 J2 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 J3 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 J4 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 J5 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 J6 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 J8 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 J9 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 J10 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 J11 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 J12 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 K7 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 K8 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 K9 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 K10 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 K11 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 K13 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 K14 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 K15 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 K16 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 K17 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 K18 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 K19 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 K20 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 K21 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 L1 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 L2 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 L3 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 L4 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 L5 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 L6 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 L7 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 L8 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 L9 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 L10 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 L11 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 L12 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 L13 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 M4 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 M6 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 M7 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 M9 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 M10 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 N4 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 N5 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 N6 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 N7 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 N8 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 O3 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 O4 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 Q4 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 Q5 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 Q6 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 Q7 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 Q8 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 Q9 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 R6 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 R7 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 R8 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 R9 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 S3 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 S4 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 S5 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 S6 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 S7 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 S8 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 S9 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 S10 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 T7 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 T8 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 T9 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 T10 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 T11 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 T12 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 T13 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 T14 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 U3 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 U4 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 U5 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 U6 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 U8 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 U9 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 U10 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 U11 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 U12 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 U13 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 V3 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 V4 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 V5 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 V6 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 V7 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 V8 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 V9 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 V11 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 V12 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 V13 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 V14 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 W4 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 W5 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 W6 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 W7 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 W8 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 W9 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 W10 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 W11 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 W12 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 X2 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 X3 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 X4 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 X5 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 X6 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 X8 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 X9 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 X10 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 X11 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 X12 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 X13 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 X15 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 Y3 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 Y5 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 Y6 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 Y7 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 Y9 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    2007 Y10 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    were discovered with the SOHO LASCO coronographs and have not been observed elsewhere. They were sungrazing comets of the Kreutz group and were not expected to survive perihelion. Some of these comets show no tail at all and it is possible that some supposed observations of Vulcan were actually tiny Kreutz group comets. Details of the SOHO Kreutz comets discovered or announced this year are listed here, with an abbreviated list here.
    A/2001 SS287 [LINEAR] A 19th mag asteroid discovered by LINEAR on 2001 September 27.41 has a perihelion distance of 1.07 AU and a period of 6.13 years in a typical Jupiter family comet orbit. Perihelion was on 2001 October 20.75.

    Following recovery in 2007 the orbit was refined to give perihelion distance at 1.06 AU on 2007 September 1.7 and a period of 5.85 years. It can pass 0.07 AU from the Earth and 0.1 AU from Jupiter.


    2007 A1 (184P/Lovas)
    Comet 1986 W1 (P/Lovas) was accidentally discovered on Catalina Sky Survey images taken with the 0.68-m Schmidt telescope on January 9.07 by R. A. Kowalski. Confirming images were taken with the Mt. Lemmon 1.5-m reflector and also following posting on the NEOCP. The indicated correction to the prediction by S. Nakano in the 2006 Comet Handbook (and in The Comet's Tale) is Delta(T) = +18.6 days.
    2007 A2 (P/Christensen)
    Eric Christensen discovered a 19th magnitude comet during the Mount Lemmon Survey on January 10.41. Following the IAUC announcement it was linked to asteroid 2006 WY182. It has an elliptical orbit with period of 16 years and was near perihelion at 2.8 AU.
    2007 A3 (185P/Petriew)
    The recovery of 2001 Q2 (P/Petriew) was announced in the IAUC on January 14, although details of the recovery by Filip Fratev had been posted on the comets mailing list on January 12. The comet was 16th magnitude at recovery, with an indicated correction of Delta(T) = -0.04 day to the predictions on MPC 51822 ( and in The Comet's Tale).
    2007 A7 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    This was a non-group comet discovered in C2 images by Luciano Cane on 2007 January 10.
    2007 B1 (P/Christensen)
    Eric Christensen discovered a 19th magnitude comet during the Catalina Sky Survey on January 17.27. Following posting on the NEOCP it was confirmed by several observers including Giovanni Sostero. It has an elliptical orbit with period of 14 years and was near perihelion at 2.4 AU at discovery.
    2007 B2 (Skiff)
    Brian Skiff discovered an 18th magnitude comet with the LONEOS 0.59-m Schmidt on January 23.39. The preliminary orbit gives perihelion at 2.7 AU in 2008 October. The comet could reach 13th magnitude around the time of perihelion. An improved orbit by Hirohisa Sato gives a slightly more distant perihelion at 3.0 AU in 2008 August.

    Brian Marsden notes on MPEC 2007-V49 [2007 November 6] that

    The "original" and "future" barycentric values of 1/a are +0.001709 and +0.001792 (+/- 0.000005) AU^-1, respectively.
    The large "original" value suggests that this comet has made a previous visit to the inner solar system.
    2007 B3 (186P/Garradd)
    Gordon Garradd discovered an 18th magnitude comet on images taken for the Siding Spring Survey with the 0.5-m Uppsala Schmidt on January 25.70. The preliminary orbit suggested that the comet was at perihelion at 4.0 AU in 2006 March, however the latest elliptical orbit gives perihelion at 4.3 AU in 2008 March and a period of 11 years.

    Maik Meyer found some prediscovery observations in archive imagery from 1996 and 1975, which should lead to numbering of the comet.

    I managed to find this comet in three DSS images after playing around with orbits and finding the anchor point with the 1996 images. It should be visible in a plate of 1995, but was not seen. Also I could not find it in some NEAT images. In the 1975 images the comet is quite bright, probably due to the slow motion. The appearance is almost the same in the two different plates, although at a different position. I have taken the position of the center of the short trail. The 1996 image is involved with a star. Here I could only measure the end of the trail.
    Hirohisa Sato has computed a new orbit linking the apparitions. Subsequently to Maik's identification, Gareth Williams identified a comet, reported by Russell Eberst in 1978 from UK Schmidt plates taken at Siding Spring in 1977 and designated as 1977 O1 as being the same comet. With observations at three returns the comet is now likely to be numbered 186P. The brightness of the object does seem rather more variable than expected for such a distant object, so it may be subject to occasional outbursts, much as 29P/Schwassmann-Wachman.

    Seiichi Yoshida notes that:

    The perihelion distance is large at 4.3 A.U., and the orbit is almost circular with an eccentricity of 0.12. Kenji Muraoka's calculation revealed that this orbit does not change significantly for 200 years in the 20th and 21st centuries.

    It reaches 17.5 mag at best based on the brightness at the discovery in 2007 January. The brightness in 1996 February was similar, however, the comet was unexpectedly bright at 15.5 mag in 1975 May and June. It seems to have been a temporary outburst, as the comet returned to its normal brightness in 1977 July at 18 mag.

    This comet is similar to 111P/Helin-Roman-Crockett; large perihelion distance, almost circular orbit, and a record of unexpected brightening in temporary outburst.


    2007 C1 (P/Christensen)
    Eric Christensen discovered a 19th magnitude comet with the 0.68-m Schmidt during the Catalina Sky Survey on February 9.28. Following posting on the NEOCP it was confirmed by Giovanni Sostero and E Guido. The orbit given on the discovery IAUC & MPEC was parabolic, although a suggestion was given that it might be elliptical. Further observations and a calculation by Hirohisa Sato showed that it did have an elliptical orbit. The latest orbit gives a period of 6.5 years, with perihelion at 2.1 AU in early March.
    2007 C2 (P/Catalina)
    A 19th magnitude asteroidal object discovered by the Catalina Sky Survey on February 9.14 and posted on the NEOCP has been found to show cometary characteristics by several observers including Giovanni Sostero and E Guido. There are numerous prediscovery observations, the oldest by the Catalina Sky Survey on 2006 October 19. The comet reaches perihelion in early September at 3.8 AU and has a period of 19 years.
    2007 C7 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    This was a non-group comet discovered in C2 images by Hua Su on 2007 February 2.
    2007 C12 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    This was a non-group comet discovered in C2 images by Hua Su on 2007 February 8.
    2007 D1 (LINEAR)
    A 19th magnitude asteroidal object discovered by LINEAR on February 17.28 and posted on the NEOCP has been shown to have a coma and tail. The orbit given on the discovery IAUC & MPEC was a low inclination parabola, with the comet near perihelion at 2.6 AU. It will fade. The next orbits to be issued were dramatically different, and have a higher inclination and perihelion at 8.8 AU in 2007 June. Calculations by Hirohisa Sato allow the possibility of a hyperbolic orbit, which was confirmed by subsequent orbits.

    Brian Marsden notes on MPEC 2007-W67 [2007 November 26] that

    The "original" and "future" barycentric values of 1/a are +0.000054 and +0.000749 (+/- 0.000004) AU^-1, respectively.
    The small "original" value suggests that this is a "new" comet from the Oort cloud.
    2007 D2 (Spacewatch)
    A 20th magnitude object discovered by Spacewatch on February 17.46 and posted on the NEOCP has been shown to have a coma and faint tail by other observers. The comet is in a retrograde orbit and was at perihelion at 1.2 AU in November 2006. It will fade.
    2007 D3 (LINEAR)
    A 19th magnitude asteroidal object discovered by LINEAR on February 20.09 and posted on the NEOCP has been shown to have a coma and tail. The orbit given on the discovery IAUC & MPEC shows it to be a distant object, and the latest orbit gives perihelion at 5.2 AU in 2007 May.

    Brian Marsden notes on MPEC 2007-X37 [2007 December 7] that

    The "original" and "future" barycentric values of 1/a are +0.001307 and +0.001402 (+/- 0.000009) AU^-1, respectively.
    The large "original" value suggests that this comet has made a previous visit to the inner solar system.
    A/2007 DN41 [Mt Lemmon]
    This unusual asteroid was discovered from Mt Lemmon with the 1.5m reflector on February 23.45. It has a period of 5.4 years and perihelion was at 0.88 AU in late January 2007. [MPEC 2007-D64, 2007 February 23, 0.2-day orbit]. In the current orbit it can approach to around 0.2 AU of Jupiter and 0.002 AU of the Earth. This type of orbit is typical of Jupiter family comets. The object is very small, with an absolute magnitude of 26.7. It was found just after closest approach to the Earth, whilst at a distance of less than 0.02 AU.
    A/2007 DA61 [Mt Lemmon]
    This unusual asteroid was discovered from Mt Lemmon with the 1.5m reflector on February 25.15. It has a period of 100 years, an orbital inclination of 75 degrees and is near perihelion at 2.6 AU. [MPEC 2007-D73, 2007 February 26, 1.5-day orbit]. There have been no recent planetary approaches.
    A/2007 DU112 [Spacewatch]
    This unusual asteroid was discovered from the Steward Observatory on Kitt Peak with the 0.9m Spacewatch telescope on February 23.47. It has a period of 260 years and was at perihelion at 9.0 AU in 2006 July. It has aphelion at 73 AU. [MPEC 2008-P59, 2008 August 12].

    Gareth Williams notes on the MPEC that

    2007 DU112 has a Saturn MOID of 0.30 AU. There were no encounters to within 1 AU between 2007 DU112 and Saturn between 1700 and 2179.

    2007 E1 (Garradd)
    Gordon Garradd discovered an 15th magnitude comet on images taken for the Siding Spring Survey with the 0.5-m Uppsala Schmidt on March 13.72. It was confirmed by numerous CCD observers. The comet reaches perihelion at 1.3 AU in late May, when it could reach 13th magnitude. Visual observations in early April have made it significantly brighter than this at up to 9th magnitude, with a large, very diffuse coma. It is moving away from the Earth relatively quickly and will fade.

    Calculations by Hirohisa Sato showed that if it moved in a long period elipse, the period must be greater than 200 years. The latest orbit gives an eccentricity of 0.98 and a period of over 500 years.

    Brian Marsden notes on MPEC 2007-K74 [2007 May 31] that

    The "original" and "future" barycentric values of 1/a are +0.015359 and +0.016098 (+/- 0.000087) AU^-1, respectively.
    The large "original" value suggests that this comet has made a previous visit to the inner solar system.

    6 observations received so far suggest a preliminary light curve of m = 8.6 + 5 log d + [15] log r

    Observations in ICQ format, last observation 2007 April 14, updated 2007 April 16.


    2007 E2 (Lovejoy)
    Terry Lovejoy discovered a 10th magnitude comet on March 15.73, using a Canon 350D DSLR with 200mm f2.8 lens. Sixteen 90s stacked images showed the comet with strong central condensation and a green 4' coma. Visual estimates put it slightly brighter. The comet was near perihelion at 1.1 AU, but was approaching the Earth and brightened for another month, perhaps reaching 7th magnitude in late April. It is now fading rapidly. This was the first comet discovery with a DSLR.

    Terry provided this information to the comet mail list:

    I use 2 Digital SLR cameras to image the sky, and then process the images using IRIS then examine them using the blink technique on a computer monitor. After a very intense search effort in 2006 without success (one near miss with 2006M4), I had wound back my efforts in 2007 (partly because of 2006P1 and partly because of fatigue!). March 15 was only the second time this year I had done any searches in the morning sky. While downloading images from the camera on March 15 I noticed a cometary object at the edge of 16 raw images centred at RA 20h57m DEC -51d 18m made between 17h22m and 17h46m UT. Normally, the raw unprocessed images show only the brightest objects so I was very suprised that this could be an undiscovered comet. At first I though it was simply a bright deep sky object, but after processing the the intense telltale green hue and generally morphology strongly suggested comet. Additionally, when I blinked the processed images it showed small but clear motion. Astrometry quickly revealed no known object in that location. At this point I was very sure I had something :)

    The following day there was an agonising wait for cometrise (about midnight from my location) and I notified a number of people for followup observations. John Drummond being located further east had the first opportunity to see the comet. Sure enough John phoned me to confirm the existence of the comet around 11pm local time. Its the first time I have spoken to John and what a way to introduce yourself! Dan Green contacted me late on March 16 UT to advise me that the comet had been announced, but as per standard procedure the comet would not be named until an orbit was calculated and it was determined the comet was not an existing named one.

    All told I estimate I have examined about 1000 image fields since late 2004, which would equate to about 1000 hours (it takes me 10 minutes to actually examine an image, but there are other time consuming tasks like setup/development/identifying suspect objects, etc). Unfortunately I don't keep records on time taken and images examined.

    Rob McNaught informs me that unusually cloudy weather has severly hampered coverage of the Siding Springs survey. Additionally, I also checked SWAN this morning and the last posted image is February 18. Moonlight problably explained why visual observers hadn't got to the comet first.

    Here are some of my images of the comet (including the discovery set).

    Juan Jose Gonzalez observed it on April 13.2 estimating it at 7.8 in 7x50B.

    Brian Marsden notes on MPEC 2007-K75 [2007 May 31] that

    The "original" and "future" barycentric values of 1/a are +0.000617 and +0.000816 (+/- 0.000036) AU^-1, respectively.
    The large "original" value suggests that this comet has made a previous visit to the inner solar system.

    20 observations received so far suggest a preliminary light curve of m = 8.3 + 5 log d + 16.3 log r

    Observations in ICQ format, last observation 2007 April 15, updated 2007 April 16.


    2007 E3 (187P/LINEAR)
    Eric Christensen recovered comet 1999 J5 (P/LINEAR) in images taken on March 9 during the course of the Mount Lemmon Survey, with additional images taken by R A Kowalski on March 10. The indicated correction to the prediction on MPC 54170 is Delta(T) = -0.8 day.
    A/2007 EJ [Mt Lemmon]
    This unusual asteroid was discovered from Mt Lemmon with the 1.5m reflector on March 9.14. It has a period of 5.5 years and perihelion was at 0.94 AU in late January 2007. [MPEC 2007-E35, 2007 March 10, 0.9-day orbit]. In the current orbit it can approach to within 0.15 AU of Jupiter and 0.05 AU of the Earth. This type of orbit is typical of Jupiter family comets.
    A/2007 EP88 [Siding Spring]
    This Aten asteroid was discovered from Siding Spring with the 0.5m Uppsala Schmidt on March 15.52. It has a period of 0.7 years and perihelion was at 0.09 AU in mid December 2006. [MPEC 2007-F19, 2007 March 16, 1-day orbit]. In the current orbit it can approach to within 0.15 AU of the Earth. It is estimated at 1.3km diameter.
    2007 F1 (LONEOS)
    A 19th magnitude asteroidal object discovered by LONEOS on March 19.26 with the 0.59m Schmidt, and posted on the NEOCP has been shown to have cometary characteristics by many observers including Peter Birtwhistle and Giovanni Sostero et al. The latest orbit gives perihelion at 0.4 AU in late October. The comet became a binocular object around this time. It is however intrinsically quite faint, and its exact magnitude curve remains to be seen.

    Images by Michael Jaeger and Gerald Rehman on September 14 suggest that it was around 11th magnitude, roughly a magnitude brighter than expected, so it is highly likely to reach easy binocular visibility. Within a week a few visual observations were suggesting that it might have brightened to 9.5. Only a few visual observations are available, and these give a relatively faint absolute magnitude, so it may not survive perihelion.

    Martin McKenna, observing from Northern Ireland on the evening of October 3 with a 22cm Dobsonian, estimated the comet at around 7.5, noting that it was strongly condensed with a 3' coma. I observed it on October 15.77 with 20x80B, noting a strongly condensed coma and a total magnitude of 6.7.

    After perihelion it faded fairly quickly and by mid November was 8th magnitude. The observations are best fitted by a linear light curve, peaking before perihelion.

    Brian Marsden notes on MPEC 2007-K76 [2007 May 31] that

    The "original" and "future" barycentric values of 1/a are +0.000679 and -0.000184 (+/- 0.000075) AU^-1, respectively.
    The large "original" value suggests that this comet has made a previous visit to the inner solar system. Brian Marsden further notes on MPEC 2007-V97 [2007 November 13] that
    Non- gravitational parameters A1 = +1.44 +/- 0.17, A2 = +0.5613 +/- 0.0779.

    53 observations received so far suggest a preliminary light curve of m = 6.3 + 5 log d + 0.0496 (dT - 11.2)


    A/2007 FD1 [Steward]
    This sun-skirting asteroid was discovered from the Steward Observatory, Kitt Peak with the 0.9m reflector on March 16.47. It has a period of 4.5 years, a highly eccentric orbit and perihelion was at 0.06 AU in late December 2006. [MPEC 2007-F34, 2007 March 19, 2-day orbit]. It would have been in the SOHO/STEREO coronagraph field between December 14 and 27, but if asteroidal would have been fainter than 12th magnitude. In the current orbit it can approach to within 0.12 AU of the Earth.
    A/2007 FL1 [Catalina]
    This unusual asteroid was discovered during the Catalina Sky Survey with the 0.7m Schmidt on March 17.46. It has a period of 5.7 years and perihelion is at 1.15 AU in mid May 2007. [MPEC 2007-F41, 2007 March 19, 2-day orbit]. In the current orbit it can approach to within 0.2 AU of Jupiter and 0.13 AU of the Earth. This type of orbit is typical of Jupiter family comets.
    2007 G1 (LINEAR)
    A 19th magnitude asteroidal object discovered by LINEAR on April 10.38 and posted on the NEOCP has been shown to have a coma and tail by amateur observers Giovanni Sostero & Ernesto Guido, Guido, A. Lepardo & Sostero, Rolando Ligustri and Peter Birtwhistle. The latest orbit gives perihelion at 2.6 AU in mid November 2008. The comet will come within visual range in March 2008, reaching 10th magnitude for southern hemisphere observers near the time of perihelion and remain visible into 2009.

    Brian Marsden notes on MPEC 2007-K77 [2007 May 31] that

    The "original" and "future" barycentric values of 1/a are +0.000167 and +0.000086 (+/- 0.000131) AU^-1, respectively.
    The relatively large "original" value suggests that this comet has probably made a previous visit to the inner solar system.

    9 observations received so far suggest a preliminary light curve of m = 2.8 + 5 log d + [15] log r

    Observations in ICQ format, last observation 2008 June, updated 2008 July.


    2007 H1 (P/McNaught)
    Rob McNaught discovered a 16th magnitude comet on images taken for the Siding Spring Survey with the 0.5-m Uppsala Schmidt on April 17.79. It was confirmed by several amateur CCD observers. Further observations showed that it has a period of 7.0 years. The comet reaches perihelion at 2.3 AU in mid August, when it could be a magnitude brighter, perhaps reaching 14th magnitude.
    2007 H2 (Skiff)
    Brian Skiff of the Lowell Observatory discovered an 18th magnitude comet on CCD images taken by himself with the 0.59-m LONEOS Schmidt telescope on April 19.26. It was confirmed by numerous CCD observers. The comet passed perihelion at 1.4 AU in mid February.

    Brian Marsden notes on MPEC 2007-K15 [2007 May 18] that further [astrometric] observations of this comet are very desirable.


    2007 H3 (P/Garradd)
    Gordon Garradd discovered a 17th magnitude comet on images taken for the Siding Spring Survey with the 0.5-m Uppsala Schmidt on April 22.51. It was confirmed by N. Teamo and Sebastian Hoenig using a 0.41-m f/8 reflector at Punaauia, Tahiti. Prediscovery images from March were found in Siding Spring observations. The comet reaches perihelion at 1.8 AU in mid August, and has a period of 6.5 years.
    2007 J7 (188P/LINEAR-Mueller)
    Rob McNaught recovered comet P/1998 S1 with the 0.5-m Uppsala Schmidt at Siding Spring on May 13 and Jim Scotti independently recovered it with the Spacewatch 1.8-m f/2.7 reflector at Kitt Peak on June 26.5. The indicated Delta(T) correction to the prediction on MPC 51824 is +0.03 day.

    The comet was numbered following recovery.


    2007 JA21 (LINEAR)
    A rather unusual looking asteroidal orbit on MPEC 2007-J52 [2007 May 12] was followed within 24 hours by an IAUC giving a cometary designation and a note that the MPEC was premature. The object, discovered by LINEAR on May 11.30, was at perihelion at 5.4 AU in 2006 November and moves in a near perpendicular orbit.

    Brian Marsden notes on MPEC 2007-O22 [2007 July 19] that

    The "original" and "future" barycentric values of 1/a are +0.000104 and +0.000030 (+/- 0.000033) AU^-1, respectively.
    The relatively large "original" value suggests that this comet may have made a previous visit to the inner solar system.
    2007 K1 (Lemmon)
    A 20th magnitude asteroidal object discovered by the Mt Lemmon Survey on May 18.44 with the 1.5m reflector, and posted on the NEOCP has been shown to have cometary characteristics by many observers including Peter Birtwhistle and Giovanni Sostero et al. It is a very distant object, not far from perihelion at 9.2 AU.

    Brian Marsden notes on MPEC 2007-O23 [2007 July 19] that

    The "original" and "future" barycentric values of 1/a are +0.002530 and +0.002528 (+/- 0.000084) AU^-1, respectively.
    The large "original" value suggests that this comet has probably made a previous visit to the inner solar system.
    2007 K2 (P/Gibbs)
    Alex Gibbs discovered a 19th magnitude comet on Catalina Sky Survey images taken with the 0.68m Schmidt on May 21.15. The comet was not far from perihelion at 2.3 AU and has a period of about 19 years.

    Brian Marsden notes on MPEC 2007-N33 [2007 July 13] that further [astrometric] observations of this comet are very desirable.


    2007 K3 (Siding Spring)
    An apparently asteroidal 19th magnitude object found by Gordon Garradd during the course of the Siding Spring Survey with the 0.5m Uppsala Schmidt on May 23.43 was found by Rob McNaught to show a coma a couple of nights later. The comet reached perihelion at 2.05 AU in April 2008. It was predicted to reach 14th magnitude around the time of perihelion, however no visual observations have been reported to the BAA.

    Brian Marsden notes on MPEC 2008-P18 [2008 August 4] that

    The "original" and "future" barycentric values of 1/a are +0.000724 and +0.000575 (+/- 0.000043) AU^-1, respectively.
    The large "original" value suggests that this comet has probably made a previous visit to the inner solar system.
    2007 K4 (Gibbs)
    Alex Gibbs discovered an 18th magnitude comet on Catalina Sky Survey images taken with the 0.68m Schmidt on May 25.32. The comet was near perihelion at 3.5 AU.

    Brian Marsden notes on MPEC 2007-O24 [2007 July 19] that further [astrometric] observations of this comet are desirable.


    2007 K5 (Lovejoy)
    Terry Lovejoy discovered a 13th magnitude comet on May 26.34, using a Canon 350D DSLR with 200mm f2.8 lens. Twelve 90s stacked images showed the comet as circular, 1' across, with a clear blue-green color but no tail. Hirohisa Sato calculated several preliminary orbits. The comet was just past perihelion at around 1.1 AU, and it is in an orbit with a period around 300 years. Terry provides the following information on the discovery
    This particular comet (designated C/2007K5) was found as a small faint but still rather obvious blue-green haze in my images from the evening of May 26. My initial estimate is mag 13, but I admit I have not attempted more precise photometry and visually the comet could well be brighter. Interestingly the discovery was made during a bright waxing moon and in the evening sky where moderate light pollution prevails. On the evening I had both cameras (a Canon 300D + Canon 350D) mounted the usual way with the 300D pointed towards -18 declination and the 350D pointed towards declination -11. This allows me to image 13 degree wide sweep of sky from west to east. Some 12 individual starfields were covered with both cameras, with 12 subexposures of 90 seconds for each starfield.

    The following day, I downloaded the images from my 300D and ran them through the usual automated processing steps (IRIS is used for this). This processing step outputs 2 images per starfield effectively separated by 10 minutes so that moving objects like comets can be identified. By 'blinking' the 2 images one can see objects like asteroids and comets bobbing backwards and forwards. On examining the first image I almost immediately noticed a moving small hazy object with a distinctive blue green colour typical of many comets. I knew I had something for sure, and notified a number of other for confirmation of a possible comet.

    Confirmation came on May 28 when both John Drummond and I made followup observations, which were then sent to Dan Green at CBAT. Further followup was obtained on May 29 by Rob McNaught before an official circular (IAUC 8840) announced the new comet as C/2007 K5. Interesting, C/2007 K5 required less than 20 hours of actual searching in contrast to the estimated 1400 hours for C/2007 E2.

    The comet itself appears to be quite faint, and will problably remain that way, but a comet none-the-less. Further astrometry is require to calculate an orbit and once this is done the comet will be named.

    Brian Marsden notes on MPEC 2007-O25 [2007 July 19] that further [astrometric] observations of this comet are desirable.


    2007 K6 (McNaught)
    Rob McNaught discovered an 18th magnitude comet on images taken for the Siding Spring Survey with the 0.5-m Uppsala Schmidt on May 27.80. The comet reached perihelion at 3.4 AU in early July.

    Brian Marsden notes on MPEC 2007-P28 [2007 August 10] that

    The "original" and "future" barycentric values of 1/a are +0.005141 and +0.005184 (+/- 0.000073) AU^-1, respectively.
    The large "original" value suggests that this comet has probably made a previous visit to the inner solar system.
    2007 M1 (McNaught)
    Rob McNaught discovered a 19th magnitude comet on images taken for the Siding Spring Survey with the 0.5-m Uppsala Schmidt on June 16.71. The comet reaches perihelion at 7.5 AU in 2008 August. Hirohisa Sato notes that the orbit may be a long period ellipse.

    Rob notes

    This object resulted from southerly winds forcing me to survey in the north, looking in a small area unsurveyed in the last month! Every one is pleasing, but I'm not going to lose sight of the fact that this is a team effort using some great software (in recent years largely down to Ed Beshore and Eric Christensen). Steve Larson's group, as with some others, have all been enthusuiasts, committed to the project and discovery. Thus the naming policy adopted within the group; the observer/discoverer gets a personal credit in the naming. Having a survey name by default would certainly take much of the shine off the discovery process for me, and I think for most people it is both an incentive and a motivation.

    Our current funding will go thru to the end of 2008, but after that there is no guarantee of funding for the project in general or the Uppsala telescope. Any possible new project might involve a different telescope, different location, different people and different naming policy. Still, I've had a great innings and a few more before the end of next year would be most pleasing!

    Brian Marsden notes on MPEC 2007-Q24 [2007 August 26] that

    The "original" and "future" barycentric values of 1/a are +0.000352 and +0.000381 (+/- 0.000205) AU^-1, respectively.
    The large "original" value suggests that this comet has probably made a previous visit to the inner solar system.
    2007 M2 (Catalina)
    A 20th magnitude asteroidal object discovered by the Catalina Sky Survey on June 20.19 and posted on the NEOCP has been found to show cometary characteristics. The comet reaches perihelion in 2008 December at 3.5 AU.

    Brian Marsden notes on MPEC 2007-W68 [2007 November 26] that

    The "original" and "future" barycentric values of 1/a are +0.000603 and +0.000979 (+/- 0.000036) AU^-1, respectively.
    The large "original" value suggests that this comet has probably made a previous visit to the inner solar system.
    2007 M3 (LINEAR)
    A 17th magnitude asteroidal object discovered by LINEAR on June 21.31 and posted on the NEOCP has been found to show cometary characteristics. The comet reaches perihelion in 2007 September at 3.5 AU.

    Orbit computations by Hirohisa Sato suggested a long period ellipse with a period of around 1000 years and this was confirmed by further observations.

    Brian Marsden notes on MPEC 2007-Q25 [2007 August 26] that

    The "original" and "future" barycentric values of 1/a are +0.006249 and +0.006082 (+/- 0.000047) AU^-1, respectively.

    2007 M5 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    This was a non-group comet discovered in C2 images by Bo Zhou on 2007 June 25. It has an unusually small perihelion distance of 0.0011 AU. If the orbit is correct this means that it would have hit the sun.
    2007 M8 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    This was a non-group comet discovered in C2 images by Hua Su on 2007 June 25.
    2007 N1 (191P/McNaught)
    Rob McNaught discovered an 18th magnitude comet on images taken for the Siding Spring Survey with the 0.5-m Uppsala Schmidt on July 10.73. The comet reaches perihelion at 2.0 AU in 2007 September and has a period of around 6.6 years.

    Images from August and November 2000 were found in archival LONEOS and NEAT observations by Syuichi Nakano in early September and it was given the designation 2000 P3 for this return. Following publication of the identification on MPEC 2007-R04 further images from September and December 2000 were found in the NEAT archives by Maik Meyer and Reinder Bouma.


    2007 N2 (189P/NEAT)
    Comet 2002 O5 (P/NEAT) was recovered serendipitously by LINEAR in New Mexico in astrometry from July 15.23 and following accidental posting on the NEOCP was confirmed by G. Lombardi and E. Pettarin at Farra d'Isonzo, Italy and F. Fratev and E. Mihaylova at Plana, Bulgaria. It was around 16th magnitude. The correction to the predictions on MPC 51823 is Delta(T) = -0.36 day.
    2007 N3 (Lulin)
    An apparently asteroidal object of 19th magnitude, discovered by Quanzhi Ye, a student at Sun Yat-sen University (Guangzhou, China), on images acquired by Chi Sheng Lin (Institute of Astronomy, National Central University, Jung-Li, Taiwan) with the 0.41-m f/8.8 Ritchey-Chretien reflector in the course of the Lulin Sky Survey, was found to show marginal cometary appearance in CCD images taken by J. Young with the Table Mountain 0.61-m reflector. The retrograde orbit gives perihelion at 1.2 AU on 2009 January 10.

    Quanzhi Ye has also discovered a number of SOHO comets. This is the first discovery of a comet from Taiwan and the observatory is a non- professional one. The Lulin Sky Survey is a co-operative project between China and Taiwan.

    The comet emerged from conjunction for near equatorial observers around December 15 and rapidly moved into the morning sky. By Christmas it was visible to observers between 50 N and 40 S. The comet became visible to UK observers in early 2009, and was a naked eye object in 2009 February. It will remain visible until early May.

    The comet passed through the SOHO C3 field between November 17 and December 4. It should have been around 7th magnitude to visual observers, but was clearly fainter than this. However Michael Mattiazzo did locate the 9th magnitude nuclear condensation in C3 images from December 1. On observation by Juan Jose Gonzalez Suarez on December 21.3 made it 7.6 in 25x100B, rather fainter than expected from the pre conjunction light curve.

    Michael Mattiazzo points out:

    We are observing comet 2007 N3 (Lulin) "edge-on". The orbital inclination of the comet is 178 degrees. i.e. virtually in the same orbital plane as the Earth. This means from Earth's perspective, we will observe the comet edge-on throughout the apparition! The effect of this is to enhance the surface brightness of the comet and its dust tail. Take the deep sky example of an edge-on galaxy being more readily observable than one that is face-on.

    Recently posted images are displaying the sharp sunward pointing dust tail (antitail) in PA 100, along with the ion tail at PA 280. The dust tail should remain at approximately PA 100 to 110 and appear as a sharply defined "needle-like" appendage. Since most of the dust particles are released in the comets wake, the dust tail will rapidly lengthen after Lulin's flyby of the Earth on Feb 24, length uncertain but perhaps a few degrees long. The ion tail however will appear considerably shortened, since it will be pointing directly away from the Sun when the comet is located at opposition on Feb 26.

    Peter Bus notes:
    In the period 2009 February 24 - March 4, C/2007 N3 (Lulin) reaches a near backward scattering geometry (phase angle < 10 degrees, with a minimum of 0.1 degrees (!) on Feb. 26.3). Using a linear phase coefficient of beta = 0.02, a maximum brightening of about 0.6 magnitudes on Feb. 26 is possible. In a moonless dark sky, there are good opportunities for photometric measurements. The so-called opposition effect, mainly observed between scatter angle 173 and 180 degrees at moon and asteroids, is unlikely.
    The comet showed a spectacular anti-tail prior to opposition, and brightened to around 4.5. Since opposition it has faded quite rapidly and will continue to do so.

    Brian Marsden notes on MPEC 2008-E12 [2008 March 3] that

    The "original" and "future" barycentric values of 1/a are +0.000019 and +0.000813 (+/- 0.000008) AU^-1, respectively.
    The large "original" value suggests that this comet has probably made a previous visit to the inner solar system.

    178 observations received so far suggest a preliminary corrected light curve of m = 5.6 + 5 log d + 8.2 log r

    Observations in ICQ format, last observation 2009 March, updated 2009 March.


    2007 O1 (LINEAR)
    A 17th magnitude asteroidal object discovered by LINEAR on July 17.23 and posted on the NEOCP has been found to show cometary characteristics by several groups including the Remanzacco and several other Italian groups, and by Peter Birtwistle in the UK. The comet is just past perihelion at 2.9 AU.
    2007 O2 (190P/Mueller)
    Comet 1998 U2 was recovered by L. Buzzi and F. Luppi, Varese, Italy on 2007 July 26 on CCD images obtained with a 0.60-m reflector. Peter Birtwhistle made confirming CCD observations on July 27. The indicated correction to the predictions on MPC 51823 is Delta(T) = +0.3 day.
    2007 P1 (McNaught)
    Rob McNaught discovered a 19th magnitude comet on images taken for the Siding Spring Survey with the 0.5-m Uppsala Schmidt on August 7.72. The initial orbit suggests that the comet was at perihelion at 0.6 AU in March this year. At this time it would have been around 11th magnitude, but poorly placed for visual observation. It might however have been visible in the SOHO SWAN images. This is the 50th comet discovered from Siding Spring.

    Brian Marsden notes on MPEC 2007-Q20 [2007 August 24] that further [astrometric] observations of this comet are very desirable.


    A/2007 PA8 [LINEAR]
    This unusual asteroid was discovered by LINEAR with the 1.0m reflector on August 9.21. It has a period of 5.2 years and perihelion is at 0.88 AU at the end of February 2008. [MPEC 2007-P35, 2007 August 11, 2-day orbit]. In the current orbit it can approach to within 0.25 AU of Jupiter and 0.01 AU of the Earth. This type of orbit is typical of Jupiter family comets.
    2007 Q1 (Garradd)
    Gordon Garradd discovered a 19th magnitude comet on images taken for the Siding Spring Survey with the 0.5-m Uppsala Schmidt on August 21.65. The preliminary orbit suggests that the comet was at perihelion at 3.0 AU in 2006 December.

    Brian Marsden notes on MPEC 2007-S20 [2007 September 19] that further [astrometric] observations of this comet are very desirable.


    2007 Q2 (P/Gilmore)
    An apparently asteroidal object, found by Alan Gilmore on CCD images taken with the Mount John University Observatory 1-m reflector on August 22.58, has been shown to have a coma and tail after posting on the NEOCP. The comet was near perihelion at 1.8 AU and has an elliptical orbit with period around 13 years.

    Rodney Austin commments on the comet mailing list:

    As a little bit of an aside to this discovery. This is second official discovery of a comet from Mt John, not counting the independent discovery by Alan Thomas of Comet Barbon in 1966; (a miscommunication between Mt John and the Carter Observatory in Wellington saw Alan miss out on getting co-credit).

    The first official discovery was by Mike Clark (P/Clark) in 1973. At that time I was working at Mt John myself, and was off duty that evening - comethunting (!) only about 100 metres away from the building where Mike was busy taking plates for the Bamburg Observatory patrol. He found the comet on inspecting his plates the following day. He started looking VERY closely at his plates after just missing the discovery of the SN in NGC 5253 the previous year.

    I have been in touch with Alan Gilmore who says that he was as surprised as everyone else over this one.


    2007 Q3 (Siding Spring)
    An apparently asteroidal object discovered by Donna Burton with the 0.5-m Uppsala Schmidt telescope in the course of the Siding Spring survey on August 25.76, has been shown to have a cometary appearance after posting on the 'NEOCP' webpage. The comet was at perihelion at 2.3 AU in October 2009. It reached 9th magnitude around the time of perihelion, and is visible to northern hemisphere observers, although a morning object. At discovery it was over 7 AU from the Sun.

    Brian Marsden notes on MPEC 2007-U59 [2007 October 23] that

    The "original" and "future" barycentric values of 1/a are +0.000309 and +0.000412 (+/- 0.000152) AU^-1, respectively.
    The large "original" value suggests that this comet has probably made a previous visit to the inner solar system.

    28 observations received so far suggest a preliminary corrected light curve of m = 2.0 + 5 log d + 13.2 log r


    2007 R1 (P/Larson)
    Steve Larson discovered an 18th magnitude comet on September 4.37 in images taken during the Mt Lemmon survey with the 1.5m reflector. The comet has a period of around 15 years and perihelion was at 4.4 AU in 2007 August.
    2007 R2 (P/Gibbs)
    A R Gibbs discovered an 18th magnitude comet on September 10.41 in images taken during the Catalina Sky Survey with the 0.68m Schmidt. The cometary nature was confirmed following posting on the NEOCP. The comet has a period of around 6.4 years and was just past perihelion at 1.5 AU.
    2007 R3 (P/Gibbs)
    Alex Gibbs discovered a 19th magnitude comet on September 14.29 in images taken during the Catalina Sky Survey with the 0.68m Schmidt. The cometary nature was confirmed following posting on the NEOCP. The comet has a period of around 8.9 years and was at perihelion at 2.5 AU in July.

    Brian Marsden notes on MPEC 2007-V52 [2007 November 6] that further [astrometric] observations of this comet are desirable.


    2007 R4 (P/Garradd)
    Gordon Garradd discovered an 18th magnitude comet on images taken for the Siding Spring Survey with the 0.5-m Uppsala Schmidt on September 14.61. The cometary nature was confirmed following posting on the NEOCP. The comet has a period of around 14 years and was near perihelion at 1.9 AU.
    2007 R5 (P/SOHO)
    A Kracht II group comet reported from SOHO C2 imagery by Bo Zhou on September 10.76 is the return of the comet predicted by Sebastian Hoenig, confirming the identity 1999 R1 = 2003 R5. The time of perihelion is September 11.3, in exact agreement with the prediction. Following the precedent of comets 1P, 2P and 27P a suggestion is that the comet should be re-named comet Hoenig. An alternative view is that others have also suggested possible linkages between the SOHO comet groups, eg Rainer Kracht, Brian Marsden and Maik Meyer and that deciding on who should get precedence will be difficult. The comet should have been numbered 192, but was not. A linked orbit for the three returns was published on MPEC 2007-S16, in which Brian Marsden comments that:
    The orbit is from C2 observations only. The current C3 observations increasingly deviate to more than 0.5 arcmin west and almost 1 arcmin north of the computed position by the end of the sequence.
    This disagreement between C2 and C3 may have implications for the accuracy of previously derived SOHO orbits.

    One reason being given for the failure to number the object is that it may not be a comet, despite its cometary designation. Demonstrating that the light curve is non-asteroidal may be one solution, or clear evidence of a coma or tail would certainly confirm it.

    According to the linked orbit by S. Nakano the comet will approach Earth in 2035 at 0.27 AU, in 2038 at 0.19 AU and in 2043 at 0.30 AU.


    A/2007 RV19 [LINEAR]
    This unusual asteroid was discovered by LINEAR with the 1.0m reflector on September14.12. It has a period of 5.9 years and perihelion was at 1.18 AU at the end of 2007 August. [MPEC 2007-R85, 2007 September 15, 1-day orbit]. In the current orbit it can approach to within 0.4 AU of Jupiter and 0.19 AU of the Earth. This type of orbit is typical of Jupiter family comets, although it has shown no sign of cometary activity.  It was recovered in 2013 August.
    2007 S1 (P/Zhao)
    Haibin Zhao at the Purple Mountain Observatory, discovered an 18th magnitude comet on CCD images obtained with the 1.04-m f/1.8 Schmidt telescope at XuYi Station on September 17.79. This was confirmed after posting on the NEOCP, and additional prediscovery observations were found in LONEOS observations by Tim Spahr. The comet has a period of about 7.4 years and reaches perihelion at 2.5 AU in December.

    Brian Marsden notes on MPEC 2007-V52 [2007 November 6] that further [astrometric] observations of this comet are desirable.


    2007 S2 (Lemmon)
    A 19th magnitude asteroidal object discovered by the Mt Lemmon Survey on September 25.49 with the 1.5m reflector, and posted on the NEOCP has been shown to have cometary characteristics by two observers, whilst others have provided astrometry. The provisional orbit makes it a distant object near perihelion at 6.2 AU, however Brian Marsden notes that it is probably of intermediate or short period.

    Independent orbit computations by Hirohisa Sato and Kenji Muraoka suggest an orbital period of around 60 years, with perihelion at 5.7 AU in summer 2008. This was confirmed, with the latest orbit giving a period of around 44 years and perihelion at 5.5 AU in September 2008.


    2007 S11 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    This was a non-group comet discovered in C2 images by Rainer Kracht on 2007 September 29.
    2007 T1 (McNaught)
    Rob McNaught discovered a 13th magnitude comet on images taken for the Siding Spring Survey with the 0.5-m Uppsala Schmidt on October 9.42. The comet reached perihelion at 1.0 AU in December. The comet has emerged from solar conjunction and visual observers estimated the comet at around 9th magnitude in early January. It was not well placed for observation from the UK, although Peter Birtwistle was amongst those reporting confirming observations of the discovery.

    44 observations received so far suggest a preliminary light curve of m = 7.4 + 5 log d + 13.4 log r

    Brian Marsden notes on MPEC 2008-E09 [2008 March 1] that

    The "original" and "future" barycentric values of 1/a are +0.000627 and +0.000476 (+/- 0.000004) AU^-1, respectively.
    The large "original" value suggests that this comet has probably made a previous visit to the inner solar system.
    2007 T2 (P/Kowalski)
    Richard Kowalski discovered a 17th magnitude comet on October 9.51 in images taken during the Catalina Sky Survey with the 0.68m Schmidt. The cometary nature was confirmed following posting on the NEOCP. The comet has a period of around 5.4 years and was just past perihelion at 0.7 AU.

    Brian Marsden notes on MPEC 2007-Y06 [2007 December 17] that further [astrometric] observations of this comet are desirable.

    Dimitry Chestnov suggests

    I think that P/2007 T2 (Kowalski) = D/1770 L1 (Lexell). They both have almost the same orbital elements (at the observed epoches) and both orbits are unstable. Tisserand parameters TJ of these comets are very close. I know that some comets, that frequently approach Jupiter, tend to jump between two distinct orbits several times.

    As we know, D/1770 L1 (Lexell) was thrown out from its orbit by Jupiter in 1779 to a distant, even probably a hyperbolic, orbit (too high uncertainty for quantitative estimate). In 2004, P/2007 T2 was injected by Jupiter from a distant orbit to its present orbit, that resembles orbit of D/1770 L1.

    Using EXORB software, I generated 1000 "Monte-Carlo" clones of P/2007 T2 and went back in time in tens of years ago in SOLEX. Some of the clones came from time to time to orbits similar to D/1770 L1.

    Whilst Gary Kronk notes
    K. Kinoshita's web site (http://jcometobs.web.fc2.com/pcmt/k07t2.htm) indicates that P/2007 T2 passed 0.0195 AU from Jupiter on 2004 September 29 and that the orbital period was altered from 9.8 years to 5.4 years. Prior to that date, there were no significant close encounters back to the 1893 apparition (the earliest date the comet's orbit is integrated to), when the period was about 9.2 years.

    These details are important because of the examinations of the orbital motion of D/1770 L1 (Lexell) after its last close encounter with Jupiter (0.0015-0.0016 AU) in 1779. In 1976, E. I. Kazimirchak-Polonskaya and S. D. Shaporev concluded that the comet was probably placed into an orbit with a period of 260 years, although a much longer period was not out of the question. In 2003, Kinoshita found that the comet was ejected into an orbit with a period of about 200 years. Kinoshita also indicated the perihelion distance was likely increased to 5.2 AU by the 1779 encounter. From both of these sets of calculations, it is probably safe to say that comet Lexell would not have returned to the sun's vicinity before 1984, if not much later.


    2007 T3 (192P/Shoemaker-Levy)
    Rob McNaught recovered comet P/1990 V1 (=1990o = 1990 XV) on October 12.45 as an 18th magnitude object with a small coma. The indicated correction to the orbital elements on MPC 51824 is Delta(T) = +4.5 days. The comet will only brighten a little and is clearly several magnitudes fainter than at its discovery apparition. Seiichi Yoshida notes:
    Kazuo Kinoshita's calculations reveal that the orbital elements of this comet have not changed much since 1939.

    It was discovered about two months after the perihelion passage in 1990. That was probably because it had been located in the southern sky until that time.

    Maybe this comet tends to be brightest after perihelion passage. If so, the comet may brighten rapidly after this, and may reach 14.5 mag in February.

    However, it was not discovered in September or October in 1990 when it must have been observable and bright. So maybe a temporary outburst occured in 1990 November.


    2007 T4 (P/Gibbs)
    Alex Gibbs discovered an 18th magnitude comet on Catalina Sky Survey images taken with the 0.68m Schmidt on October 12.46. The comet passed perihelion at 2.0 AU in July and will fade. It has a period of around 12 years.

    Brian Marsden notes on MPEC 2008-A27 [2008 January 7] that further [astrometric] observations of this comet are desirable.


    2007 T5 (Gibbs)
    Alex Gibbs discovered another 18th magnitude comet the following night on October 13.46, on Catalina Sky Survey images taken with the 0.68m Schmidt. The comet reaches perihelion at 4.0 AU in 2008 May and moves in a long period ellipse of about 300 years.

    Brian Marsden notes on MPEC 2007-Y07 [2007 December 17] that

    The "original" and "future" barycentric values of 1/a are +0.021240 and +0.021733 (+/- 0.000001) AU^-1, respectively.
    The large "original" value suggests that this comet has made a previous visit to the inner solar system.
    2007 T6 (P/Catalina)
    An apparently asteroidal object of 18th magnitude, found with the 0.68m Schmidt during the Catalina Sky Survey on October 13.47 and posted on the NEOCP was found to show a coma and faint tail on images taken by J W Young with the Table Mountain 0.61-m f/16 Cassegrain reflector. The comet was at perihelion at 2.2 AU in August and has a period of around 9.5 years. The comet has also been identified with asteroid 2007 TU149 by S Nakano.

    Brian Marsden notes on MPEC 2007-Y08 [2007 December 17] that further [astrometric] observations of this comet are desirable.


    2007 U1 (LINEAR)
    A 19th magnitude asteroidal object discovered by LINEAR on October 19.41 and posted on the NEOCP has been found to show cometary characteristics by several observers including the Remanzacco group. The comet is predicted to reach perihelion at 3.3 AU in 2008 August.

    Brian Marsden notes on MPEC 2008-P51 [2008 August 11] that

    The "original" and "future" barycentric values of 1/a are +0.000168 and +0.000065 (+/- 0.000003) AU^-1, respectively.
    The large "original" value suggests that this comet has probably made a previous visit to the inner solar system.
    2007 U2 (193P/LINEAR-NEAT)
    Comet 2001 Q5 (P/LINEAR-NEAT) was recovered by K. Sarneczky and L. L. Kiss with the 2.3-m reflector at Siding Spring on October 21.45. The indicated correction to the prediction on MPC 54167 is Delta(T) = -0.5 day.
    2007 V1 (P/Larson)
    Steve Larson discovered a 17th magnitude comet on November 8.31 in images taken during the Catalina Sky Survey with the 0.68m Schmidt. The comet has a period of around 11 years and perihelion is at 2.7 AU in 2007 December.
    2007 V2 (P/Hill)
    BAA Member, Rik Hill discovered a 19th magnitude comet on November 9.30 in images taken during the Mt Lemmon survey with the 1.5m reflector. The comet has a period of around 8.2 years and perihelion was at 2.8 AU in 2007 July.

    Brian Marsden notes on MPEC 2007-X46 [2007 December 10] that further [astrometric] observations of this comet are desirable.


    2007 VQ11 (P/Catalina)
    A slightly diffuse object found by Andrea Boattini on Catalina images taken on 2008 February 1.1, was confirmed by J Young at Table Mountain Observatory and then linked by Tim Spahr with the object found by Catalina on November 3.42. This had been designated following linkage with observations made from Purple Mountain Observatory on November 6. The comet has a period of around 13 years and is near perihelion.
    2007 VO53 (Spacewatch)
    An unusual asteroid found at Mt Lemmon with the 1.5m reflector on January 11 was posted on the NEOCP, and then identified by Tim Spahr with an object discovered by Spacewatch on November 1.26. Several other prediscovery observations were also identified, and further observations with the Spacewatch 1.8-m telescope on January 13 showed a convincing coma. The comet reaches perihelion at 4.8 AU in April 2010.

    Brian Marsden notes on MPEC 2008-Q26 [2008 August 25] that

    The "original" and "future" barycentric values of 1/a are +0.000066 and +0.000093 (+/- 0.000007) AU^-1, respectively.
    The small "original" value suggests that this comet has probably not made a previous visit to the inner solar system.
    A/2007 VJ8 [Mt Lemmon]
    This unusual asteroid was discovered from Mt Lemmon with the 1.5m reflector on November 5.26. It has a period of 5.8 years and perihelion was at 1.12 AU in mid November. [MPEC 2007-V46, 2007 November 6, 1-day orbit]. In the current orbit it can approach to within 0.1 AU of Jupiter and 0.13 AU of the Earth. This type of orbit is typical of Jupiter family comets.
    A/2007 VA85 [LINEAR]
    This highly unusual asteroid was discovered by LINEAR with the 1.0m reflector on November 4.09. It has a retrograde orbit with a period of 7.6 years and perihelion was at 1.09 AU at the end of July. [MPEC 2007-V73, 2007 November 9, 5-day orbit]. In the current orbit it can approach to within 0.25 AU of Jupiter and 0.14 AU of the Earth. The object has the shortest known retrograde orbit and has shown no sign of cometary activity.
    A/2007 VA188 [LINEAR]
    This unusual asteroid was discovered by LINEAR with the 1.0m reflector on November 12.08. It has a period of 6.6 years and perihelion was at 1.10 AU at the end of October. [MPEC 2007-V112, 2007 November 14, 2-day orbit]. In the current orbit it can approach to within 0.25 AU of Jupiter and 0.14 AU of the Earth. This type of orbit is typical of Jupiter family comets.
    A/2007 VE189 [Mt Lemmon]
    This unusual asteroid was discovered from Mt Lemmon with the 1.5m reflector on November 11.49. It has a period of 6.2 years and perihelion is at 1.10 AU in late November. [MPEC 2007-V115, 2007 November 15, 3-day orbit]. In the current orbit it can approach to within 0.1 AU of Jupiter and 0.12 AU of the Earth. This type of orbit is typical of Jupiter family comets.
    A/2007 VW266 [Mt Lemmon]
    This very unusual asteroid was discovered from Mt Lemmon with the 1.5m reflector on November 12.38. It has a period of 12 years, moves in a retrograde orbit and perihelion is at 3.35 AU in 2008 August. [MPEC 2007-W59, 2007 November 19, 7-day orbit]. It can approach within 0.9 AU of Jupiter.
    2007 W1 (Boattini)
    Andrea Boattini discovered an 18th magnitude comet on November 20.48 in images taken during the Mt Lemmon survey with the 1.5m reflector. The comet was at perihelion at 0.84 AU in late 2008 June.

    Additional observations of the comet as asteroid 2007 WM63 were published in 2010.

    The comet brightened rapidly and came within general visual range in early March 2008. It reached binocular visibility in late April, but few UK observations were made as the comet was rather far south, and very diffuse. Southern Hemisphere observers had a better view, and were able to view it through perihelion. The brightening seemed to slow down during May, with many observers reporting it at around 6th magnitude, for example Alexandre Amorim reporting it at 5.9 in 10x50B on May 24.92. It peaked at around 5th magnitude near the time of perihelion in late June.

    It moved into view from the UK after perihelion and was imaged on July 25 by Peter Carson, from Leigh on Sea, Essex. It was visible as a weakly condensed binocular object in August. It had faded to around 10th magnitude by early September and had become quite diffuse, but then went into a steep decline, with CCD observations suggesting that it was 18th magnitude by late October.

    Cedric Bemer points out the possibility of a meteor shower from the comet. The miss distance for the orbits is 0.0178 AU and the earth passed this point 27.5 days later. Maximum was likely on August 21.9 or 27.6, with a radiant of 168 -14.

    Brian Marsden notes on MPEC 2008-E10[2008 March 1] that

    The "original" and "future" barycentric values of 1/a are -0.000002 and +0.000631 (+/- 0.000012) AU^-1, respectively.
    The small "original" value suggests that this comet has is a "new" comet from the Oort cloud, and has not made a previous visit to the inner solar system.

    171 observations received so far suggest a preliminary light curve of m = 8.6 + 5 log d + 9.6 log r.


    2007 W2 (194P/LINEAR)
    Comet 2000 B3 (P/LINEAR) was recovered by L. Buzzi and F. Luppi on CCD frames taken with a 0.60-m f/4.64 reflector at Varese, Italy on November 17.07. The indicated correction to the prediction on MPC 54167 is Delta(T) = +0.16 day.
    2007 W3 (LINEAR)
    A 20th magnitude asteroidal object discovered by LINEAR on November 29.32 and posted on the NEOCP has been found to show cometary characteristics by several observers including E. Guido and G. Sostero. The comet is predicted to reach perihelion at 1.8 AU in 2008 June.

    It is an intrinsically faint comet and may not get within visual range.

    Brian Marsden notes on MPEC 2008-B23 [2008 January 21] that

    The "original" and "future" barycentric values of 1/a are +0.000146 and +0.000542 (+/- 0.000052) AU^-1, respectively.
    The large "original" value suggests that this comet has probably made a previous visit to the inner solar system.
    A/2007 WW3 [Mt Lemmon]
    This unusual asteroid was discovered from Mt Lemmon with the 1.5m reflector on November 19.35. It has a period of 5.5 years and perihelion was at 1.09 AU in late October. [MPEC 2007-W32, 2007 November 19, 0.1-day orbit]. In the current orbit it can approach to within 0.4 AU of Jupiter and 0.10 AU of the Earth. This type of orbit is typical of Jupiter family comets.
    2007 X1 (SOHO)(IAUC )
    This was a non-group comet discovered in C2 images by Masanori Uchina on 2007 December 3.
    A/2007 XJ16 [Steward]
    This unusual asteroid was discovered at the Steward Observatory, Kitt Peak with the 0.9m reflector on December 5.38. It has a period of 5.6 years and perihelion was at 1.04 AU in early August. [MPEC 2007-X50, 2007 December 10, 1-day orbit]. In the current orbit it can approach to within 0.5 AU of Jupiter and 0.06 AU of the Earth. This type of orbit is typical of Jupiter family comets.
    2007 Y1 (LINEAR)
    A 19th magnitude asteroidal object discovered by LINEAR on December 16.38 and posted on the NEOCP has been found to show cometary characteristics by several observers. The comet will reach perihelion at 3.3 AU in 2008 March.

    Brian Marsden notes on MPEC 2008-E13 [2008 March 3] that

    The "original" and "future" barycentric values of 1/a are +0.000141 and +0.000391 (+/- 0.000071) AU^-1, respectively.
    The "original" value suggests that this comet may have made a previous visit to the inner solar system.
    2007 Y2 (McNaught)
    Rob McNaught discovered a 19th magnitude comet on images taken for the Siding Spring Survey with the 0.5-m Uppsala Schmidt on December 31.67. The comet will reach perihelion at 4.2 AU in 2008 April.

    Brian Marsden notes on MPEC 2008-E14 [2008 March 3] that

    The "original" and "future" barycentric values of 1/a are +0.001295 and +0.001272 (+/- 0.000063) AU^-1, respectively.
    The large "original" value suggests that this comet has probably made a previous visit to the inner solar system.
    Ephemerides of current comets are available on the CBAT ephemeris page and positions of newly discovered comets are on the NEO confirmation page.
    More information on LINEAR. A list of comets discovered by selected search programs.
    The Northumberland refractor is the telescope that was used in the search for Neptune. It now has a 0.30-m f20 doublet lens which gives a stellar limiting magnitude of around 15 at the zenith on good nights. The Thorrowgood refractor was built in 1864 and has a 0.20-m f14 doublet lens.
    Published by Jonathan Shanklin. Jon Shanklin - jds@ast.cam.ac.uk