Scientific Rationale

This meeting celebrates the life and achievements of Prof. John C. Lattanzio. John has made a succession of important contributions to the theory of stellar evolution over a sustained career that has seen him move to Canada, the USA and the United Kingdom before returning to his Australian roots. He remains instantly recognisable on the international stage where he is a speaker of choice on many aspects of stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis. Lattanzio's contributions to research training at all levels are numerous. His undergraduate lectures are delivered with an enthusiasm that has ignited many a career in astrophysics and he has trained a number of excellent graduate students and postdoctoral researchers who have gone on to hold positions worldwide. John is the active president of the International Astronomical Union's Division G3 on stellar evolution.
This meeting will cover the topics on which John has had such an impact through his varied and distinguished career. Scientific sessions will focus on topics on which John has worked and will include stellar evolution of low- and intermediate- mass stars, SAGB stars, nucleosynthesis, grains, galactic archeology and hydrodynamics of star formation and evolution as well as outreach sessions for the public and for undergraduates.
This meeting is being held to celebrate the scientific career of John Lattanzio. If you wish to contribute photographs of John, you can email them to us.

Session Topics

1: Stellar Evolution
Low- and Intermediate-Mass Stars
Super AGB Stars

2: Stellar Nucleosynthesis
AGB Stars
Grains
Galactic Archeology
Massive Stars

3: Stellar Physics
Thermohaline Mixing

4: Hydrodynamics
Star Formation and in Stellar Evolution

5: Astronomy for the Public and Undergraduates

Participants may be interested in a related meeting being held at Monash shortly after this meeting:

Taking place at Monash University on November 13 - 17

The meeting is devoted to two subjects:

1) Carbon-Enhanced Metal-Poor (CEMP) stars in the halo of the Milky Way, and their constraints on nucleosynthesis by the first generations of stars. This year is the 25th anniversary of their discovery, as well as the 60th orbit around the Sun for co-discoverer Timothy Beers.

2) The first science results based on DR1 from the GALAH survey -- one of the first massive high-resolution optical surveys of stars in the Milky Way, now underway at the AAT.

SOC

Christopher Tout (University of Cambridge, UK)
John Lattanzio (Monash University, Australia)
Richard Stancliffe (Argelander-Institut für Astronomie, Bonn)
Amanda Karakas (Monash University, Australia)
Ghina M. Halabi (University of Cambridge, UK)
Ross P. Church (Lund University, Sweden)

LOC

Christopher Tout (University of Cambridge, UK)
John Lattanzio (Monash University, Australia)
Richard Stancliffe (Argelander-Institut für Astronomie, Bonn)
Amanda Karakas (Monash University, Australia)
Ghina M. Halabi (University of Cambridge, UK)
Ross P. Church (Lund University, Sweden)