Institute of Astronomy

 

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Ever had a question about astronomy you've want answered? Have a look through the previous questions which we've been asked and if you can't find find your answer, ask us!

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Twinkling stars

Published on 28/02/2011 
Question: 

Why do stars twinkle and planets do not?

In fact, both stars and planets twinkle! The twinkling is due to the turbulent air in the Earth's atmosphere, blurring and distorting the image of the star. The twinkling therefore has more of an effect nearer to the horizon, where the light must travel through more of the densest parts of the Earth's atmosphere. You can see this for yourself! Compare the twinkling of a star near the horizon (such as Sirius), and one close to zenith (straight up). Objects such as the Sun, Moon and the planets are called extended sources, because the light is emitted from a disc. Objects such as distant stars are called point sources, because they appear to be a point as they are very far away. In fact, the light from extended sources can be thought of as many point sources spread over an area. The turbulent air in the atmosphere causes a point source to appear to move around on the sky ever so slightly. However if we spread many point sources over the face of the planet, all point sources move around, but we do not notice a change in the total light from the object.

The brightest star

Published on 28/02/2011 
Question: 

What is the brightest star in the night sky?

We believe our galaxy, the Milky Way, contains roughly 200 THOUSAND MILLION stars (that is, 200,000,000,000). However, if you were to count the number of stars in the night sky with a naked eye, you would only be able to count about 6,000. Besides our star, the Sun, the brightest star in the night sky is Sirius, in the constellation Canis Major (the “Big Dog”). Sirius is almost twice as bright as the next brightest star, Canopus, in the constellation Carina.

The colour of the sky

Published on 28/02/2011 
Question: 

Why is the sky blue during the day then red at sunset?

Light from the Sun contains all colours of the rainbow. When we look directly at the Sun, we see all of the light from it, so it appears white or a faint yellow. Particles in the Earth's atmosphere scatter shorter wavelength (bluer) light more than the longer wavelength (redder) light due to a process called Rayleigh scattering. During the day, the entire sky looks blue, as we are seeing the light that has been scattered towards us from all directions. However, when the Sun's rays travel through more of the denser part of our atmosphere (at sunrise and sunset) it appears red, as more of the blue light is scattered.

Supporting life on other planets

Published on 28/02/2011 
Question: 

What is the Habitable Zone?

The habitable zone is a region around a star where an orbiting planet could host liquid water. It is sometimes also known as the Goldilocks Zone, because the planet must not be too close to the star (where any water will vapourise) and not too far from the star (where water will freeze).

An exoplanet...?

Published on 28/02/2011 
Question: 

What is an Exoplanet?

An exoplanet (short for extra-solar planet) refers to planets that are orbiting stars other than our Sun. So far more than 500 have been found, through a variety of different methods, but this number is always growing! (for an up to date count see http://www.exoplanet.eu/).

The first exoplanets were found in 1992, orbiting a pulsar, a star that has reached the end of its lifespan and collapsed to form a very dense object rotating much faster than our Sun. These exoplanets would not be a very good place to visit, due to the large amounts of radiation given off by the pulsar. The first planet discovered around a more Sunlike star, 51 Peg b, would also not be a nice place to visit - although its star is more like our Sun, this exoplanet is what we call a 'Hot Jupiter', as it's a large gaseous world (like the planet Jupiter in our Solar System) and orbits very close to its host star (and so is very hot) - in fact 51 Peg b completes one orbit of its host in only 4 (Earth)days!